Library

13 June 2017

Punk zines and fanzines find a new home at Monash


The world of "Punk" is making inroads into the Rare Books Collection at Monash, says librarian Daniel Wee.


Monash University Library recently acquired a small collection of important punk zines, fanzines, and magazines to add to the Rare Books Collection.

The inception of the ‘punk zine’ in the mid to late 1970’s saw it explode into the post-punk period of the 1980’s which included the new-wave and hardcore scenes. Their purpose was to provide a platform for fans to communicate with one another and circulate ideas — think of it as blogging. Research potential with these materials lies in the exploration of the non-elite and their resistance to conformity, as well as providing valuable insight into underground and D.I.Y. publishing.

The collection includes numbers 1, 2 and 11 of Punk magazine; arguably the earliest example of the genre.

Punk,  Numbers 1, 2 and 11




Founded by Legs McNeil and John Holmstrom, these were highly influential magazines designed to promote bands, commentary, and the punk rock movement. As a rather well known artist, Holmstrom illustrated several well known Ramones albums. Our bookseller has advised us that number 2 was originally in the possession of Holmstrom, however, there is no evidence of provenance in our copy. Punk magazine popularised The Ramones, The Stooges, the New York Dolls, and was influential in the CBGB NY club phenomenon.

1st Annual Punk magazine awards ceremony
This fantastic original copy of the “1st annual Punk Magazine Awards Ceremony” (below) brought huge media attention due to the recent split of the Sex Pistols and the arrest of Sid Vicious under suspicion of murder. The awards night ensued into a drunken rowdy mess, which saw Lou Reed refusing to take the stage and accept his award for Class Clown.

Nart, Number 1
Best known for contributor Jello Biafra of the Dead Kennedys, Nart originated from an artist's collective that focused on punk and new wave in the Berkeley area.

Zone V and Killer magazine are important social document for the evolution of the punk movement as it transitioned into the 1980’s hardcore scene. Sonic Youth founder, Thurston Moore was a major contributor. It also includes an early Sonic Youth poster.


Zone V, Killer and poster of Sonic Youth in Killer

The final issue of Sluggo is referred to as the 'Industrial Collapse' issue, and signifies the transition from punk fanzines to aestheticism. 

Sluggo

The game of industrial collapse


If you would like to view any of the items referred to in this post, please do not hesitate contact us at rbinfo@monash.edu.


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Covidence - streamline your systematic review

Our medical librarians, Penny Presta and Anne Young, recommend that researchers doing a systematic review use a new online application called Covidence which  streamlines the process.


Systematic reviews are often associated with the field of medicine, where their use fosters evidence-based research and informs clinical decisions and treatments. Covidence is a web-based program designed to assist the article screening and data extraction processes of a systematic review.

Those with a good understanding of systematic review processes will find Covidence easy to navigate. It can be used by reviewers in a variety of disciplines including health, education and the social sciences and it is a recommended tool for Cochrane authors.

Access:

Covidence is now provided free for Monash researchers. Monash users can request access using their Monash email.

Key benefits:
  • Invite multiple reviewers to work on your review in real time
  • Seamlessly “import citations” from EndNote, or other reference manager tools
  • Record screening decisions and notes so disagreements can be easily resolved
  • Simply highlight and comment directly in your pdf to automatically populate your risk-of-bias tables
  • Use customisable data extraction forms
  • Integrate with RevMan for export of data files, tables and references. Data can also be exported to Excel or CSV.
Help:
All questions about Covidence can be directed to support@covidence.org, or by clicking the “?” icon directly from Covidence. 

The Covidence Knowledge Base contains a range of online videos and resources useful for those getting started.

To find out more about Systematic reviews read our Library blog article

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9 June 2017

How do I use document delivery?

The Monash University Library collection provides you with access to over four million items, but did you know that as a staff member, honours or postgraduate student you can access even more? Read on to find out about document delivery and interlibrary loans… by Catherine Hocking




Does this situation sound familiar?

You are searching your favourite database and come up with a list of amazing articles that are just perfect for your literature review - but wait, no full text coverage! Luckily our document delivery service has you covered.

What do I need to know?

Document delivery is a service for Monash staff, postgraduate and honours students allowing you to access the materials you need for your research, whether they be articles, conference papers, books, audiovisual and other materials.


You can request a copy or loan of items not held at a Monash branch library, or items that are missing from our collection. Copies of articles, chapters etc. from items that Monash only holds in print can also be supplied.

How do I use Document delivery?

The easiest way to request an article or paper is right at the point of discovery - when you are doing your database search. Many databases will have a ‘Check for full text’ button when an article is not available. Using this will first check other holdings in the Library’s Search (remember to Sign in!), and if still not available can link you through to a document delivery request form with the article details ready filled. Check that the article details have populated correctly then submit your request - simple as that!


You can also fill out a request manually so you don’t have to go through a database. Access the form through the Document delivery and interlibrary loans website, select your request type then enter as much information as you can.

How long will it take?

Most articles are supplied within 1 week, loans within 3 weeks. This can vary depending on where and how we are obtaining material. Our recent collaboration with international institutions means that many article requests with full citation details can be delivered within two working days.

Tip - the more information you can give us, the quicker we can supply your request. Including an ISSN (for journals) or ISBN (for books) is particularly helpful.

Copies will be delivered to you by email, physical items such as books are sent to your nominated Monash branch library for collection. Off-campus registered students and staff can have items sent to their home address or department location.

If you do require materials urgently, you should contact Document delivery staff to discuss your requirements.

Want to find out more? Check out our Document delivery library guide or website.



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About the Blog

Welcome to the Monash University Library blog. Whether you are engaged in learning, teaching or research activities, the Library and its range of programs, activities and resources will contribute to your success. Here you will find useful information, ideas, tips and inspiration. Your comments on any of the articles are welcome.

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