Library

Showing posts with label study. Show all posts
Showing posts with label study. Show all posts

11 April 2017

200 more study seats now available at Caulfield Library


New study spaces have opened at Caulfield Library as the builders progress steadily towards finishing the refurbishment.



Good news! There are 200 additional seats available at Caulfield Library, increasing the total to just under 800 seats.

A new area has opened for student use on level 1, adjacent to the teaching rooms. The bright and modern area has been finished just in time for students to make best use of them.

Access to this area as well as the three teaching rooms is temporarily via the Ian Potter Sculpture Courtyard. These spaces are open 9am to 6pm Monday to Friday.

The three teaching rooms are also available to students outside of Library class times. There are 30 fixed laptops that students can use for their study activities.

When the building works are completed, the library will have doubled its pre-refurbishment seating capacity from 750 to 1500 seats, offering a range of spaces for quiet study, collaboration and interactive teaching.

As the demand for study spaces has increased as the exams get closer, other study locations at Caulfield campus are available and are listed below for your convenience.



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Where to find a study space at Clayton

Our three libraries at Clayton campus together offer the largest number and range of study spaces and they're open longer during Swot Vac and exams. But there are many more alternative areas available on campus. Check the list below.



We anticipate an increased demand for quiet study spaces on campus during the Swot Vac and exam period.

While the refurbished areas in our Sir Louis Matheson Library have been opened and are popular among students, some areas are still under construction. We hope everything will be finished by the end of May.

Our Law and Hargrave-Andrew libraries have more seating and will be open from 10am to 5pm on weekends from 20 May until 23 June 2017.

In addition, Hargrave-Andrew Library will be open until 2am Monday to Thursday beginning 29 May until 23 June.

There are many more alternative areas available on campus. Check the list below.



In addition the following informal study spaces (non-bookable) are available to all students:
  • There are the lecture theatres foyers that have been set up with chairs and tables for study
  • Airport Lounge and Dining Room are also available
  • Faculty Student Common Rooms
Clayton campus study spaces may be viewed on the Clayton campus map.

You may also want to check out '200 more study seats now available at Caulfield Library'.

Additional study spaces are also available at our other campus libraries. These include:
Berwick Library (120 spaces)
Peninsula Library (250 spaces)
CL Butchers Pharmacy Library at Parkville (120 spaces)

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20 March 2017

Using academic resources - what and how

Most units you undertake at Monash will have a research component - usually in assessments, where you will be asked to support your work with academic resources. Knowing how and where to find such resources can be tricky, says Romney Adams, Subject librarian.


The good news is the Library has plenty of expertise in the area of academic resourcesand can work with you to build your research skills. Read on to discover tips that will make your journey into the world of academic research a little easier!

One thing that confuses a lot of students is understanding what an academic resource actually is. Most of us will have had no reason to look further than a textbook prior to studying at university - but you can’t just rely on your textbook for research! Articles in academic journals will often be the type of resource you’ll be looking for.

Some academic sources undergo a process known as peer review - you can find out more about the peer review process in this dino-tastic video, but essentially it means the article has been verified by independent experts in the field. Peer reviewed articles are sometimes known as ‘refereed’ articles.

Books can also be considered as academic sources. Most books you find in the Library will be considered ‘academic’ in the context of your discipline, but if you’re ever unsure, you can always ask a Librarian at the Research & Learning Point.

Okay, so you know what academic resources are...now you just need to find them! While the Library has far less physical items than it used to, we have an abundance of academic materials online - including journal articles and eBooks. We recommend using Search, the Library’s resource discovery tool, as a launching point for your research - this will give you a great overview of the literature that’s available, and you’ll be able to find plenty of materials to get you started. Once you’ve used Search, it’s best to then look at some subject-specific databases. These databases contain even more materials - many of which you won’t be able to find using Search! The Library has a Guide to databases that are particularly useful for your discipline. Of course, there’s nothing quite like getting hands-on and browsing the shelves - if you have the time - you never know what gem you may stumble across!

Getting used to searching for academic resources takes time, patience, and practice. If you feel frustrated, confused, or just want to make sure you’re on the right track, chat to a Librarian at your Library’s Research & Learning Point, or book into a workshop. Together, we’ll ensure you’re finding the right kind of sources for your assessments as quickly and easily as possible.


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13 March 2017

Stay ahead with Research and Learning Online

Want to get the best marks for your assignments? Worried you might not know how to write an academic essay or a lab report? Never fear! Check the tips in this article.



At Monash, you are independently managing your own learning. Arm yourself early on with the necessary skills to achieve your learning goals by using our online modules. Designed to help you keep on top of your studies, the modules have strategies, advice and examples of writing in subject areas.

Our learning skills advisers and librarians have been hard at work creating tutorials, guides and activities for the Research and Learning Online (RLO) website, providing you with the tools you need to stay ahead of the game.

These RLO e-learning materials cover effective study strategies including note taking in lectures, reading critically, and how best to tackle your labs to get the most out of them. There’s advice on brainstorming for assignments, thinking critically, communicating clearly and which citing and referencing method you’ll need. They also have heaps of tips on how to write academically, manage your time, and approach your exams with confidence.

See? We’ve got you covered.

Stuck on that BusEco essay? No worries! There’s a sample assignment for that for you to refer to, with lecturer’s comments and activities to enhance your understanding. There are guides for whichever field you’re in, with detailed instructions and advice.

For research and postgraduate students, there’s plenty of information about how to manage your research process, the trick to writing a great proposal, navigating copyright and demystifying the peer review process.

And the best part? It’s totally free, and accessible by you around the clock! Just visit monash.edu/rlo and find the help you need. Don’t forget that if you have any questions about your assignment or need some clarification, our learning skills advisers and librarians are available at our drop-in sessions.



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9 March 2017

Looking for advice on English grammar?

Are you looking for advice on English grammar for your assignments? Then come to a drop-in session with a Peer Support facilitator from English Connect!




Beginning week 3 of semester, these Peer Support sessions will be conveniently available alongside the Library’s Research and Learning point in the  Matheson, Hargrave-Andrew, and Caulfield libraries. This arrangement has been in place at Peninsula Library since 2016.


This means that you can drop in at the Research and Learning point for professional advice from Library staff on your research, citing and referencing and assignments, then visit the Peer Support table for all your grammar questions. Please note that neither the Library nor Peer Support offer proofreading services.


In the free 20 minute Peer Support session you can speak to a trained student-facilitator one-on-one. If you bring along one or two paragraphs of the assignment or essay you’re working on, you’ll be able to read through them together to get advice about your English grammar. You will also get tips and resources to help you in the future.


Drop-in sessions are available at the following times:
  • Matheson Library Monday to Friday: 11am to 3pm
  • Hargrave-Andrew Library (HAL) Monday and Wednesday: 11am to 3pm
  • Caulfield Library Monday to Thursday: 11am to 3pm
  • Peninsula Library Tuesday and Thursday: 1pm to 3pm

Visit the Peer Support website for more information.

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6 March 2017

New online lectures for 2017

Not only are lecture recordings easier to access now, the change to Learning Capture means you can do a lot more to participate in discussions, take notes, create your personal study guide and more. It's about your learning, not just the recording.


From 2017, online lectures are available to students through Moodle. Previously, online lectures were available through the Library website.

The new Learning Capture system is a more exciting system as it lets you view a class online while it is being conducted, and allows you to participate, take notes and bookmarks, and contact your lecturer.

By visiting the Learning Capture Getting started site you can find out how to:
  • Use the Dashboard
  • View classroom lectures and answer questions during class
  • Take notes on the material and bookmark locations to return to later
  • Participate in after-class discussions and Question and Answer forums
  • Review your class Study Guide, including your notes and bookmarks.
Lectures may be broadcast live, so that you can view the lecture from elsewhere and participate as if you were in the room. If it is a live broadcast, there will be a green icon.

Later, after a class is over, you can still participate in activities like Question and Answer forums and sharing materials with other students as well as downloading the lecture, notes, and other content, and maintaining your own personal study guide.

On the “all classes” list you will see earlier lectures and materials your instructor has posted for you to read for upcoming classes.

To download a lecture you have missed: 
  • go to your unit page in Moodle
  • click on “Learning Capture” 
  • select 'all classes' for your unit
  • click the class you wish to download
  • click on the video icon and selecting 'download original'. 
Please note, you will not be able to download a lecture if your lecturer has disabled downloads for your unit. If he or she has, the Learning Capture link will be “greyed out”. If this is the case, check with your lecturer whether online lectures will be available in the future.

Please check the Learning Capture help site if you have trouble downloading your lecture or using the features of the new system.



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Borrowing basics


Now that you’ve been to your first week of classes, you may be thinking about how to find a copy of your textbook for those pre-tutorial readings, or even for your first assignment. In this article, Clinton Bell takes you through the process of borrowing your first book from the library!



The refurbished libraries have new loans machines

How do I find the book I want?

Start by finding it in Library Search! You can get to it via the Library tile in your my.monash portal, or use the search box halfway down the library homepage. You can find most books just by typing in the title and the surname of one of the authors.

When you find a record for the book you want, there will be a “Get it” or “View it” tab underneath it. The “View it” tab will give you a link to an electronic copy of the book, if we have one. The “Get it” tab shows you how many physical copies we have, whether they’re available, and which library collection they’re in:



If the book you want is available at your campus, you can go and get it off the shelf. To find it you’ll need the call number, which is also shown on the “Get it” tab. A call number is a bit like the number in a street address - it tells you how far along the shelves your book will be.

If the book you want is only available at a different campus or all the copies are on loan, you can place a request, and we’ll send the next available copy to the library where you want to pick it up. Make sure you’re logged in (there’s a “Sign in” button in the top right), and then you should see a “Request” button near the top of the “Get it” tab.

If you’re having trouble finding what you want, just ask the Library staff!


Okay, I found it. Now how do I borrow it?

You can borrow books using the self-check systems around the library. You need to scan your ID card, then slide the book into the cradle until the barcode on the front (not the back!) is under the scanner. The machine will go “thunk!” and the book’s title will be highlighted in green on the screen when it’s ready - it does take a second or two, so don’t pull it away too fast!

There are some items which won’t work with the self-check, for example because they’re too big, a weird shape, or they don’t have a barcode on the front. If you have one of these items, or you’re just having trouble with the machine, you can also borrow at the information point.

One of the books I want has a coloured sticker on it.   What does that mean?

If we expect a book to be in high demand, we may place limits on how long some copies can be borrowed, so that more people have a chance to read it. The stickers pictured above mark books which have these restrictions.

If a sticker has a year on it, the restriction only applies for that year, so don’t worry about stickers from 2016 or earlier!

More questions?


If you have more questions about borrowing, you can view detailed information on our website, read the FAQs on ask.monash, or ask our friendly staff in person. Happy borrowing!










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3 March 2017

First in family – A world of opportunities

If you are the first in your family to start at Monash University, you might feel you are embarking on the most thrilling and yet frightening journey of your life, says Roland Clements, Learning Skills Adviser. In this post he shares with you the ‘absolute essentials’ that will help you during your first year at university.



You may be the first in your family to have ever thought about going to university. Whatever inspired you to want to study, you are here, which is wonderful - so make the most of it because education and learning can be joyous!

Until the early part of the 20th century, people went for higher education because their subjects fascinated them. They were passionate about what they were studying and intensely curious about the world around them. You are such a person, so don’t be scared or have any reservations.

I’m not going to give you an Alice in Wonderland-style tour of fascinating facts and tricks on how to get the most out of your studies. Our Library offers you a wide range of resources and services which can help you in many of these areas, and they have online tutorials to help you with your study and assignments. What I can share with you are the ‘absolute essentials’ that will help ease the stress of your first year at university. If you have these on hand you won’t feel like a castaway on a desert island (remember Tom Hanks and Mr. Wilson!).

Here are a few essentials you will need for your survival at university at the start of the year. 

1. Campus maps and Library opening hours - Good to have if you need to visit other libraries - Monash students can visit any of our branches.

2. Your Library - Get to know your Library and what it offers: computers, printers, photocopiers, physical items (such as books and DVDs), and online eResources (such as databases and academic journals). The Library staff are always here to work with you through any queries you have, no matter how trivial or complex.

3. Librarians and Learning Skills Advisers - They can work with you to build a number of skills that will be useful both during your time at Monash, and beyond! Librarians have expertise in selecting appropriate databases, searching for academic resources, evaluating sources and citing and referencing. Learning Skills Advisers can build your skills in understanding assignment tasks, structuring your work, academic writing, effective reading, and note taking.

4. Monash M-Pass -Your M-Pass is linked to an online account - you can use it to add credit, copy, print, and pay fines at the Library. You’ll also need it for exams as your student ID!

5. Your username and password - You’ll need this to log in to computers, your my.monash, and to access electronic resources (such as databases) through Library Search.

Throughout the course of a regular day at university, you will meet students and lecturers from various corners of the globe who bring their educational knowledge and experience with them. You will learn to work with people from various disciplines and how to work as a team member. No matter what stage in life or circumstances you find yourself, remember that we are all human beings and always learning. So think about the events that brought you to Monash University and make the most of it - persistence and perseverance will lead to success!

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27 February 2017

What's new for our returning students


Welcome back to our returning students. We hope you enjoyed your summer break and while it had to end, you can look forward to some fun and learning at uni.



Bookable discussion rooms at Matheson
We'd like to update you on what's happening at the Library as there are a number of changes.

Study space and facilities


The big library refurbishments at Caulfield and Matheson are progressing well and will finish during semester one. Both libraries have reopened since 20 February, after a summer-long closure.

At Caulfield, you will enter the library temporarily from the arcade level 1 between Buildings A and B (opposite Monash Connect). 

At Matheson, the temporary library entrance from the Performing Arts courtyard remains in place until further notice.


M-Pass, printing and borrowing


A new Monash ID card called M-Pass replaces the need to purchase separate print/copy cards. Your M-Pass card will be linked to an online account, so you can use it to:
  • add credit to pay for printing, copying and Library fines (the Library no longer accepts cash)
  • identify yourself on campus and at exams
  • borrow books etc. from the Library
  • access secure buildings.

Recorded lectures


Lectures Online has changed to Learning Capture. You can access 2017 lecture recordings from your unit’s Moodle page. If you're unsure where to find it or you don't see a link, contact your lecturer.


If you have a deferred exam from 2016, you can continue to access recorded lectures via MULO.


Check the Learning Capture FAQs on ask.monash.

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20 February 2017

First-day memories

Are you excited for your first day of university? Or perhaps nervous? Believe it or not, once upon a time all our librarians were freshers too! This week, four staff  - Romney Adams, Clinton Bell, Roland Clements and Romany Manuell - share their memories from when they started uni.



Clinton:

The main thing I remember about my first day at uni is getting lost. I went to the University of Melbourne, where there were three nearby buildings called the Richard Berry, Redmond Barry and Raymond Priestly Buildings. I had lectures in both the “Lowe Theatre, Redmond Barry Building” and “Love Theatre, Richard Berry Building” - and of course, on my first day I ended up at the wrong one.

The other thing I remember is that at orientation there was a company handing out free cans of their new super-strong iced coffee, which they were trying to promote as an energy drink. It was basically a can of really awful, cold espresso. Not only did it taste terrible, anyone who actually finished one ended up with a headache from caffeine overload. Don’t drink weird things just because they’re free!

Romany:

I was from the country, and I didn’t know anyone! The city kids seemed so cool, and I was wearing beige cargo pants (hey, it was the 1990s!). But I struck up a conversation with the other conscientious students who were WAY too early for First Year Anthropology and we all went to see Frenzel Rhomb together. It was the best of days, it was the blurst of days.

I don’t think I found the library until week 6… Go to the library early, and go often!

Roland:

My first day at a tertiary institution was a very long time ago, and what I remember was not the best at first. I felt lost, bewildered, beguiled and bedevilled. I remember it was a very, very hot day and I walked on to the campus grounds and all I saw was a mass of people heading somewhere, I had no idea. I saw a conga line and decided to just join the queue not knowing what the line was for and when I reached the table they were handing out lollies and a pen, “big deal”.


So, I turned around and saw a big sign saying “Library”. I expected to be told that you needed some sort of ID to get in but it wasn’t the case and found it to be the ‘coolest’ place on campus...as in ‘cold’. The librarians in there looked the way I felt. I found a nice spot and watched the madness outside. I saw a lot of students sitting in the sun to get a tan and that is one problem I sure did not have. So, I hung around for a while and then decided to see what tomorrow would bring. Things changed for the better as time went by and I met other students in my Psychology and other classes. You quickly settle into a routine and happy times follow!

Romney:


My most vivid memory was having a free can of Red Bull thrust into my hand by an overly-enthusiastic salesperson (who was probably some second-year marketing student trying to make ends meet) wheeling around a cart full of the stuff. I would love to write an emotional tale of spiral into addiction and eventual triumph through my rise from rock-bottom, but the reality is that Red Bull tastes vile. Seriously, if you haven’t tried it already…just don’t. I had to rely on a more traditional route - coffee - to maintain stimulation through the wee hours while desperately finishing off assignments.

What would have been more beneficial was visiting the library, and speaking to staff to find out how I could research effectively, so I didn’t have to rush everything in a mad panic three days before my essays were due. But I was young! Nobody told me! I didn’t know! But now that you’ve read this, you can’t use that excuse. Come visit, we’re here to work with you so you can get the most out of your time with us at Monash!



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14 February 2017

Are you a Library lover?


Did you know February 14 is also Library Lovers’ Day? Declared so by the Australian Library and Information Association, it is a day of spreading library love.


Having a healthy relationship with your library while studying means you're significantly more likely to achieve higher grades. A healthy relationship means that while you engage with the Library by using information resources and spaces available, the Library cares for you in return by providing a welcoming and inspiring place of study and the resources you need so you can do your tasks efficiently and achieve your learning outcomes. 

Not only will your grades improve, you'll be less stressed while you're working on them, too. Library staff work with you so you can develop skills to research your topic, write your assignment, finish that dreaded reference list or prepare for an oral presentation.

So for Library Lovers' Day, we're taking a moment to step back and share with you the many ways Monash students love the Library, and some "love letters" we've received over the past year. This day only happens once a year, but our staff are working hard every day to find that elusive resource, answer the difficult questions, and solve all (well, most) of your information problems.


Love letters

One of our librarians received this glowing praise from the VCAL coordinator who appreciated how she engaged well with the students.


“Today I took a group of my students to Monash to participate in a library session.  I have been bringing my students to Monash since 2010 and really appreciate the library staff giving these students an introduction to library skills.

I teach students who attend an alternative school and can be quite difficult to engage.  Romney had great presence in the classroom and was able to very quickly form a connection to the students.  She made the session both fun and informative for my students and really engaged them in the process.  The students tested her on a few occasions and she handled it with grace, humour and professionalism.  All of the students found the day to be highly engaging and enjoyable and Romney really helped to set the tone for that with the introductory session.” - Mark Hunt, VCAL Coordinator
One of our learning skills advisers got a special mention in a SETU survey last semester. In their comments students singled her out and the session she delivered as some of the aspects of the SCI2010 unit that they found most effective. The unit had its best ever ranking.
The Library workshop and tutorial
The Library classes that helped with the assessment tasks
I really enjoyed the Library session and would encourage future students to attend
Tami and the Library staff are extremely helpful and lovely
Another learning skills adviser received this feedback from a grateful student – we’ve got more than just research tips up our sleeves!
“Thank you so much. I have backed up all my work just as you taught me this morning. That is really helpful and I will not worry about that anymore. You and all the Library and eSolutions staff do such an excellent job for us. Many thanks.”
One of our Law subject librarians received a heartfelt thank you from a postgraduate student. A great example of Library staff helping students achieve greater learning outcomes.
“I just wanted to say, thank you so much for helping me with research. There was a notable difference in my marks because I had improved on research. I couldn’t have done that without your help. So I truly appreciate what you do for students!”
And this Arts student was able to find what she was looking for through our Library services:
Thank you all so much for making my research easier and more worthwhile – today I found ten much-needed books in the Holds section. This is an excellent service and so helpful and prompt.”
So go on, share something with us! We appreciate any and all comments here at the Library, and are continually aiming to improve our services for both staff and students alike, as well as the wider Monash community and all who enter our doors.

Happy Library Lovers’ Day!


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10 February 2017

Welcome to all new students

Hello to those who are newly enrolled. We hope you all had a wonderful summer break and are looking forward to your time at University.


If you're new to Monash, we've put together the Library orientation guide to give you the basics about using the Library.  You will also find Library activities in the Orientation planner.

But first, some interesting facts: did you know that research shows that students who use the Library achieve better results than those who don't? [1]

At Monash 79% of students who used the Library achieved at least a Distinction, based on students' best estimates of their academic results. In the user survey, “Library use” meant either coming in to the Library or accessing it online daily or 2-4 days a week. [2]


Study spaces and facilities

The big Library refurbishments are progressing really well and will finish during semester one. New students will find that they are using smart refurbished areas with facilities like bookable discussion rooms for group projects and study, in both the Caulfield and Matheson libraries. 

At both libraries temporary entrances and some inconvenience will apply until the building projects are finished. Study facilities are available throughout and regular services continue.

At Caulfield, to start off with, you will enter the library from the arcade level 1 between Buildings A and B (opposite Monash Connect). 
    
At Matheson, the temporary library entrance is from the eastern side in the Performing Arts courtyard near Robert Blackwood Hall, until further notice.  

Programs, resources and activities

As well as working with you in your courses and units, we provide a range of programs and drop-in sessions related to your assignments and other tasks. Drop-ins begin from Week 2.

We’ve developed a new Research and Learning Online site as your gateway to the Library’s online learning materials. Check it out to access online modules such as academic integrity, citing and referencing, and more.

Visit the Students’ page for a complete list of Library programs, resources and activities.

Don’t forget to check this blog for useful articles with tips and advice for your study. You can also find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram.



1   Soria, K. M., Fransen, J., & Nackerud, S. (2013). Library use and undergraduate student outcomes: New evidence for students’ retention and academic success.  Portal : Libraries and the Academy, 13(2), 147-164.  

2  2015 Monash University Library User survey

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3 November 2016

Additional study spaces opened on weekends at Caulfield

The following additional study spaces will be available to students at Caulfield during the next two weekends.
These rooms in Building K will be available on the 5th, 6th, 12th and 13th November 2016 from 10am - 8.30pm.
Room 208    (22 Spaces)
Room 210    (26 Spaces)
Room 211    (44 Spaces)
Room 212    (38 Spaces)
Room 213    (49 Spaces)
You may also want to refer to the list of other study spaces published earlier. 


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18 October 2016

Hargrave-Andrew Library - extended hours and bus

Get more study done, with late night opening at the Hargrave-Andrew Library.


From Monday 24 October 2016, until the end of the exam period, the Hargrave-Andrew Library at Clayton will offer extended exam study time.

This will be a good location for you to meet with your friends for a quiet group study session or for an intensive effort on your own.

During this four-week period:

  • The Hargrave-Andrew Library will be open from 8am until 2am Monday to Thursday inclusive.
  • There will be security and a security bus in operation until 3am on the days the library is operating on extended hours.
  • Fridays and weekends will operate on normal hours.
The extended hours will finish on Thursday 17 November.

Check the opening hours for all libraries. Because it is undergoing refurbishment, the Sir Louis Matheson Library will close at 9pm throughout semester two and the exam period.

Study spaces are available elsewhere on Clayton campus this year, including in the Menzies building, the Campus centre and Monash residential halls – Find out more.

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17 October 2016

Additional study spaces at Caulfield

Students at Caulfield campus now have a range of available study spaces, in addition to those in the Caulfield Library.


With the Swot Vac and end of year exam period beginning next week, we understand there is an increased need for study spaces on campus.

Our Caulfield Library offers individual, group and informal study areas to suit a range of different work preferences. Current refurbishment works to transform the library, however, can make finding a study space more difficult during this busy exam preparation period.

To help you, we’ve compiled a comprehensive list of all the study spaces on campus.




More information
Use ask.monash to view answers or ask a question.
Visit Monash Connect or call +61 3 9902 6011 Monday - Friday, 9am - 5pm.
View the Caulfield campus map (PDF, 0.1 MB).


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10 October 2016

Great tips for exam preparation

Exam time is creeping up, so (if you haven’t already) it’s time to focus on getting ready to ace them! This post will share some great tips for making the most of your revision time so you can feel confident and get those good grades. By Michelle De Aizpurua and Emma Price.



No-one wants to be cramming for exams the night before, and it’s definitely not a good strategy for doing well on your exams. Planning your schedule for study well ahead of time ensures you don’t have to cram, and this will also reduce your stress levels.

Sometimes just thinking about how much studying you need to do can seem overwhelming. You might not know where to start and so you procrastinate and put it off. Many students make a start and then get distracted looking at memes and social media. There’s even a whole movement around ‘procrastibaking’ (at least you can keep your energy levels up by eating yummy baked goods!).

How can you avoid the evil powers of procrastination? It can be a challenge. Try breaking down what you need to do into manageable chunks, as focussing on these smaller tasks will make the work seem less daunting. There are also some helpful apps and extensions you can download which will block your access to some ‘time-wasting’ websites. Try out StayFocused for Chrome, or ColdTurkey for all browsers. Read about some other hacks for blocking distractions, such as using a work only browser, on Hack My Study.


Revision strategies

Rote learning vs meaningful learning

Memorising everything by repetition (rote learning) is not the most effective learning technique. You need to do more than just read over your notes or textbook. A better approach is to develop a deeper understanding of each topic and the connections between them. This is called ‘meaningful learning’ and research shows it is a better method for your exam study. By developing an understanding of the meaning of what you are learning, rather than just memorising the information, you can then more easily apply the knowledge to new situations and use it to solve problems.

There are a range of different study styles you can use to help you develop a meaningful understanding of the information. Some ideas include:
  • Making posters of main topic information - either note form or diagram. Post them up where you will see them often. Go over them regularly and then test yourself.
  • Record yourself talking about a topic on your smartphone and then listen back to it on the train or walking.
  • Form a study group. Talking through unit topics with your peers can be a great way to expand your knowledge, work through trickier ideas together, and revise what you already know. The very process of discussing with others is another way to help your brain retain information, as well as giving you some friendly support during the exam period.
Mnemonics
These are scientifically proven memory devices for remembering information more easily. There are nine common examples of mnemonics, some of which you may already be using without realising it. Music mnemonics use a tune to help you remember information, just like the ‘ABC’ song for remembering the alphabet. In expression or word mnemonics, the first letter of each word you need to remember is used to make a phrase. A well known example of this mnemonic is for remembering the music notes on the lines of the treble clef - Every Good Boy Deserves Fruit. Other mnemonics involve making diagrams or models, using rhyme, note cards, images, outlines and connections between ideas.

Context and practice
Test yourself often. As well as any sample exam questions provided by your unit, you can also create your own tests by turning your unit topics into questions. You might want to try simulating exam conditions by getting rid of all distractions, putting away your notes and assigning a set amount of time to answer some questions on your topics.

One benefit of simulating exam conditions is that it utilises context-dependant memory. In psychology, this is the theory that your recall of information is improved if the context of how you learnt it is the same as the context in which you try to recall it. Godden and Baddeley (1975) demonstrated this concept by showing that people who learnt words underwater were more easily able to recall those words when they were underwater again, rather than on land. So, use this to your advantage and create a context that you can replicate in the exam to aid your memory! You could even try wearing a lucky sweater in study sessions and then wear it to the exam.

Visit the Library

If you are still feeling unsure about your exam preparation, attend a Library session. There are a few on offer and you can attend any session at any campus for free. Search for ‘exam’ on the class booking webpage.

And don’t forget a friendly Librarian or Learning Skills Adviser is available to speak with you at a drop in at the Library.

Above all, remember that effective study is about how much you learn, not how much time you spend hunched over your desk. So keep these tips in mind, and good luck!






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4 October 2016

Access to Caulfield Library during exam study time - bring your ID card

Students and staff are reminded to bring their ID cards when visiting the library at Caulfield campus from next Monday.


Caulfield Library will be open to only Monash staff and students between 10 October and 11 November 2016, to help ensure they have the best chance to find a study space.

Students from all campuses who plan to use Caulfield Library over this period must carry their Monash ID. This will minimise inconvenience and ensure you are not delayed at the library entrance.

Seating in the library is much more limited this year because of the refurbishment. When completed in April 2017 the library will have double the number of seats it had in the past.

The temporary exclusion of non-Monash visitors was introduced a few years ago to alleviate the shortage of study space experienced at Caulfield during the exam study period, when use is at its peak.

During the exclusion period, CAVAL and ULANZ registered borrowers will be able to retrieve and borrow specific items, but will not be able to study in the library. Alumni and external fee-paying Library members will continue to have access by presenting their Library card.

The exclusion also does not apply to Sir John Monash Science School and Nossal High School students.

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3 October 2016

Turning study stress into study success!


As you approach the end of semester you may find that most of your work is due at the same time. Yikes!  Learning Skills Adviser Tami Castillo says not to worry, as there are many things that you can do to make study more fun and get through it.



You may have exams approaching fast. This can be stressful, especially if this is your first time, or if you haven’t done so well in past semesters. It is always worth remembering that you’re not alone.

Misery loves company

No one wants to be miserable alone. We say this in jest, but working with others who are in the same circumstance can make your studies less stressful, and more enjoyable. One thing you can do to be with like-minded people is to form a study group (see below for tips). Another good idea is to attend a library session on exam preparation, where we can share a few tips and strategies with you face-to-face. There are a few on offer and you can attend any session at any campus for free. Use the Library Class Booking System to see what’s available by searching using the keyword ‘exam’.

Form a study group

  • Study at uni can be a lonely business. Why not reach out to some people in your tutorial and form a study group? Ideally, a study group consists of 4 or 5 members… any more than that, and you’re looking at a party! There are many benefits to study in a group. For instance:
  • Improve your notes - compare lecture notes with group members and fill in any information or important concepts you didn’t quite understand.
  • Share your talents - each of us approach learning in a different way, and many of us have different strengths and weaknesses. By studying as a group, members can share talents and insights, and learn from each other
  • Provide a support system - forming a group is a great way to keep each other motivated and support one another. We are also more inclined to do our revision notes if group members are relying on you.
  • Cover more material - group work allows you to focus on more concepts, as multiple people can review more material compared to a single person working alone. Spread the work around so each person reviews a topic, and then teaches it to the rest. And if you want to improve your understanding of a topic, the best method is to nominate yourself to be the one to teach it!
  • It can make learning fun! - Studying with a group is a great way to liven up your study sessions. It can be very monotonous and draining to spend long hours alone. Studying in a group environment makes learning much more fulfilling and enjoyable.
To learn more about these tips and others for effective group study, go to: http://www.educationcorner.com/studing-groups.html

Your study group will contain a wide range of personalities, skills and knowledge in your group - cool! This means any areas that individual members think are weaknesses for them can be overcome by the members who are strong in those areas. Your strengths are not just an advantage for you - your teammates can also reap the benefits. Put your skills to use reviewing course materials. Put your group to the test by working on past exam questions together.

Revision - turn a boring chore into clever fun

In the table below, have a look at the column on the left - If a statement describes you and the way you like to work, take advantage of it by giving the method in the column on the right a try!

I like setting and meeting goals
Use a to-do list
I work best against the clock
I like to draw or doodle
Use mind maps to outline how to solve a problem or draw a picture of a concept
I like music
Write songs about important information that you need to remember….read more here!
I’m a night owl. I enjoy staying up late
Study when you are most alert and do mundane tasks when you are least alert
Solve questions from the textbook
A no-brainer
If there are few questions, turn chapter titles into questions then practise answering them - for example…

Chapter titles:
  • Managing in a global environment
  • Social responsibility and managerial ethics
  • Managing change and innovation
  • Motivating employees




(Robbins, Bergman, Stagg, & Coulter, 2012)


Questions:
  • What issues arise for managers in a global environment?
  • What is social responsibility and how do managerial ethics apply to it?
  • How are change & innovation best managed?
  • Why & how do managers motivate employees?



If you remain uncertain about how to be efficient and take joy in your academic work, don’t forget a friendly Librarian or Learning Skills Adviser is available to speak with you at a drop in.

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About the Blog

Welcome to the Monash University Library blog. Whether you are engaged in learning, teaching or research activities, the Library and its range of programs, activities and resources will contribute to your success. Here you will find useful information, ideas, tips and inspiration. Your comments on any of the articles are welcome.

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