Library

Showing posts with label news. Show all posts
Showing posts with label news. Show all posts

11 April 2017

200 more study seats now available at Caulfield Library


New study spaces have opened at Caulfield Library as the builders progress steadily towards finishing the refurbishment.



Good news! There are 200 additional seats available at Caulfield Library, increasing the total to just under 800 seats.

A new area has opened for student use on level 1, adjacent to the teaching rooms. The bright and modern area has been finished just in time for students to make best use of them.

Access to this area as well as the three teaching rooms is temporarily via the Ian Potter Sculpture Courtyard. These spaces are open 9am to 6pm Monday to Friday.

The three teaching rooms are also available to students outside of Library class times. There are 30 fixed laptops that students can use for their study activities.

When the building works are completed, the library will have doubled its pre-refurbishment seating capacity from 750 to 1500 seats, offering a range of spaces for quiet study, collaboration and interactive teaching.

As the demand for study spaces has increased as the exams get closer, other study locations at Caulfield campus are available and are listed below for your convenience.



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4 April 2017

Communicating your PhD research


Your PhD research is relevant to a range of audiences, but how will you reach them? Learning Skills Adviser Andrew Junor shares some of the key ways to communicate your research effectively.



As you begin your PhD journey, you first focus closely on the research process and development of your thesis. Before you know it, your research will generate new knowledge that people want to hear about. Below are some of the key ways you can share your ideas with different audiences.

1. Your thesis

Your thesis will express the clearest, most comprehensive statement of your research objectives and findings. Initially you will write your thesis for two small but crucial audiences: your supervisors and thesis examiners. In time, your thesis may be accessed more broadly by scholars in your field.

How can you make sure your thesis is communicating your ideas clearly?
  • Explore the Graduate Research and Writing resources on Research and Learning Online. Perhaps you need techniques for writing about research literature or reporting and discussing data?
  • Have a look at theses published by other researchers. These can provide helpful models for how to structure your ideas and write engagingly in your field of scholarship
  • Seek support for your English language skills, or discuss writing structure and academic communication with a learning skills adviser in your subject area
  • Attend a Graduate Education seminar on thesis writing, editing and proofreading. As a graduate researcher, you can book relevant professional development seminars through your MyDevelopment account


2. Academic publications

Academic publications such as peer-reviewed journal articles allow you to share your ideas with a broader audience of researchers within your field. Such publications indicate your research output and its degree of impact – but how can you reach your readers?


3. Conference presentations

Attending an academic conference is a great way to meet other researchers in your field and expand the reach of your ideas. By presenting a conference paper, you communicate your research to a niche network of scholars exploring research questions closely related to your own.

How can you make sure your conference participation inspires other scholars?
  • Prepare for an effective oral presentation: plan with a clear purpose and audience in mind, prepare a structure to convey your ideas succinctly, and practice the talk so your delivery connects confidently with the audience.
  • Anticipate how you might respond to questions from your audience. The discussion that follows a formal presentation is a crucial opportunity for communication: you might persuade a fellow scholar to change their thinking, or to remember you as an emerging talent in the field.
  • Share ideas with conference participants on social media before, during and after the conference. On Twitter, you can join the conversation by using the designated conference hashtag or interacting with the Twitter accounts of conference organisers and attendees
    .
  • Deposit your conference paper or poster on the monash.figshare digital repository. Your research document will be given a Digital Object Identifier (DOI), making it much easier to share on social media


4. Community and media engagement

Audiences beyond academia will want to hear about your research. As a graduate researcher, try to identify groups of people who will be excited by your findings: are these audiences found in particular industries, fields, professions, localities, or cultural or social groups? Where could your research have greatest public impact or engagement?

Here are some tips for communicating with a wider audience:
  • Organise media coverage of your research. Journalists are always looking for opportunities to connect interesting stories with relevant audiences. If you want help sharing your expertise with an appropriate media outlet, contact the Expertline service operated by the Monash media team
  • Give public talks. A wide range of cultural institutions invite graduate researchers to contribute to their public talks programs: these include local and state libraries, research institutes, museums, galleries and annual festivals. Think about the range of forums and audiences available in a city like Melbourne, and reach out to organisers when you see a good fit with your ideas
  • Discuss your research on social media. Like traditional modes of communication, social media can reframe your ideas in unexpected and rewarding ways. Maybe one of your Twitter followers will share a useful new resource or guide you towards more insightful analysis? As Altmetrics gain prominence, online engagement may become part of how your research impact is measured. The library can assist you to use author identifier tools such as ORCID to ensure you receive appropriate attribution when sharing research online
Research benefits from collaborative, open discussion. The more you share your ideas with others, the more clearly you will be able to communicate them - and the more likely it will be that others will be inspired by your research and offer feedback.

Still have questions about how you can effectively communicate your PhD research to relevant audiences? Talk to your supervisors or peers about their approaches, or have a chat with a learning skills adviser or subject librarian in your faculty team.

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29 March 2017

New architectural database: Explore by building type


Birkhäuser Building Types Online is a whole new way of searching for information on building types and specific projects, writes Romany Manuell, Subject Librarian for Art, Design and Architecture.


If you're an architecture student or researcher, you're probably familiar with many of the Library's database subscriptions. You've probably used Avery Index to Architectural Periodicals, and you certainly will have found articles using JSTOR. But have you tried Birkhäuser Building Types Online? This new database by the publisher De Gruyter has articles (just like those other databases) but also includes vector-based drawings, architectural plans, photographs and much more.

The main feature of Birkhäuser Building Types Online is that it allows you to explore by building type or morphological type, rather than just by keywords. If you're looking to browse office buildings, you'll find 67 of them currently listed - with more coming every day! If you choose to view a particular office building in the list, such as VPRO Villa by MVRDV, you’ll see site plans, professional photos of the exterior, and a brief description of the project.

However, if you were to search for the architectural practice MVRDV, you’ll see all the entries for individual projects (including VPRO Villa, Villa KBWW and Mirador Residential Complex). You’ll also find excerpts from books in the De Gruyter collection that mention the architectural practice. This will give you an excellent starting point for your research into building types and specific projects. Explore and enjoy!


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20 March 2017

Access to General Collection at Matheson Library

Beginning Wednesday 22 March, the South stairwell and lifts in the Sir Louis Matheson Library will be closed to users to allow the builders to speed up the internal works in this area.

Users can access the General Collection via the rear stairs (East). These stairs are located behind the computer area to the left of the Library's temporary entrance on the lower ground floor. You can access the ground floor up to level 5 via these rear stairs.

Users with a disability may request Library staff assistance at the Information point to retrieve items from the General Collection.

The quiet study spaces in the General Collection will be affected by noisy works. Please find alternative quiet spaces in the Matheson Library, or at either Law or Hargrave-Andrew Libraries on the Clayton campus.

The South stairwell and lift works are expected to be completed between 29 March and 4 April. We will provide updates as works progress.

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Citing and referencing - a guide for teaching staff

Citing and referencing is an essential academic skill that students enrolled in your teaching unit may struggle with, says Librarian Louise Micallef. She outlines some ways the Library can help your students.

Despite the fact that they have undertaken research for school assignments, work or personal purposes, for most students, the university is often the first encounter they have with academic literature. The need to reference their work accurately according to a prescribed style can cause some anxiety, particularly as it affects overall marks.

At the Library, we are experts at citing and referencing and can help your students to understand and apply this crucial skill, which is required in assignments at university level to:
  • demonstrate the credibility of their ideas 
  • validate their work 
  • give due credit to the research of others, and
  • allow readers to locate the original sources used for ideas and evidence in an assignment.
In my experience as a subject librarian, some of the most common citing and referencing mistakes made by students are:
  • incorrect use of commas, italics and ampersands
  • spelling inconsistencies
  • overuse of direct quotes
  • incorrect use of ‘et al.’
  • wrong order of multiple citations in a single parenthesis
  • failure to include a DOI for journal articles if appropriate for the style
  • failure to list all cited sources in the reference list and to do so in accurate alphabetical order
  • general formatting errors such as spacing and use of hanging indents
  • inability to correctly identify the resource type they are dealing with.
Evidently, the protocols and intricacies of referencing are often overwhelming and quite daunting for some students. So where can  you direct your students so they can learn the principles of citing and referencing  and how to effectively and accurately apply it to their work? The Library has created a number of excellent resources and opportunities for students to develop these crucial academic skills.

Five ways the Library can help your students with citing and referencing

1. Library Guides – Citing and Referencing and EndNote

We create Library guides to pull together useful resources on a variety of research skills topics or subject areas all in the one place. The Citing and Referencing Library Guide  covers the full range of citing and referencing styles used at Monash. Students can learn about why, how and when to cite and reference for their next assignment or research paper there.

Similarly, EndNote is a very useful reference management software that stores and automatically creates citations, references and bibliographies for assignments in the required style. Of course, EndNote is not foolproof, so we recommend that students understand how citations and references are used in academic writing when using the program to ensure accuracy. For a comprehensive guide to using Endnote, including "how to use it"  tutorials, see our EndNote Library Guide

2. Demystifying Citing and Referencing - tutorial

The Library has also created an online, interactive citing and referencing tutorial which includes activities and short self-assessment quizzes. It has been designed to teach the principles of citing and referencing, and understand how to avoid plagiarising when integrating source material. This valuable tutorial takes approximately 20 minutes to complete.

3. Research and Learning Point – drop-in sessions

Students can drop in for a 15 minute consultation with a Subject Librarian or Learning Skills Adviser at the Library. At a drop-in session students can get advice on research for their assignments, academic communication and study skills including citing and referencing.

There is no need for them to make an appointment and students are seen on a first come, first served basis. This service is offered between week two to twelve at all Monash libraries. See session times here.

4. Library program, resource or activity embedded in curriculum

We can work with you to design and teach a particular segment, class or resource as part of the academic curriculum for your unit, to ensure that students know the principles of citing and referencing and how to apply them for your assignments and projects.

Contact our specialist staff  to discuss further

5. One on one consultations (postgraduate students)

Librarians and learning skills advisers have specialist knowledge of resources and publishing in various subject disciplines. Postgraduate students are entitled to make individual appointments with their subject librarian and learning skills adviser at any stage of their research. We can provide you with specialist advice about citing and referencing for thesis or journal article submission.

Contact our specialist staff  to make an appointment.

So, if citing and referencing evokes a sense of dread in your students, help is always available from the Library both in person and online!





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9 March 2017

Looking for advice on English grammar?

Are you looking for advice on English grammar for your assignments? Then come to a drop-in session with a Peer Support facilitator from English Connect!




Beginning week 3 of semester, these Peer Support sessions will be conveniently available alongside the Library’s Research and Learning point in the  Matheson, Hargrave-Andrew, and Caulfield libraries. This arrangement has been in place at Peninsula Library since 2016.


This means that you can drop in at the Research and Learning point for professional advice from Library staff on your research, citing and referencing and assignments, then visit the Peer Support table for all your grammar questions. Please note that neither the Library nor Peer Support offer proofreading services.


In the free 20 minute Peer Support session you can speak to a trained student-facilitator one-on-one. If you bring along one or two paragraphs of the assignment or essay you’re working on, you’ll be able to read through them together to get advice about your English grammar. You will also get tips and resources to help you in the future.


Drop-in sessions are available at the following times:
  • Matheson Library Monday to Friday: 11am to 3pm
  • Hargrave-Andrew Library (HAL) Monday and Wednesday: 11am to 3pm
  • Caulfield Library Monday to Thursday: 11am to 3pm
  • Peninsula Library Tuesday and Thursday: 1pm to 3pm

Visit the Peer Support website for more information.

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28 February 2017

A teaser book display at Peninsula Library

A new book display at Peninsula Library provides a teaser about the exhibition that's opening soon in the Sir Louis Matheson Library at Clayton campus. 


An interesting display at Peninsula Library features a number of books chosen to complement the exhibition that will open soon in the Sir Louis Matheson Library at Clayton.

The Peninsula Library display is about journeys for the young and the young at heart, says Daniel Wee, a librarian who's part of our Rare Books team and who chose the items for the display.

"From skirmishes with swashbuckling pirates to voyages to the farthest outreaches of our galaxy, tales of adventure and discovery play an integral role in the creation of children's literature. Before movies and television, fantastic stories fired the imagination of young readers," says Daniel.

Books, like the boys' and girls' annual -- gift books which contained many stories and pictures -- and much loved favourites, The Wizard of Oz and Alice in Wonderland, are held in various forms in Monash University Library's collections.

The Library has four collections of children's books located in the Peninsula Library and the Matheson Library-based collections of Teaching Materials, the Melbourne Centre for Japanese Language Education (MCJLE) and the Lindsay Shaw Collection in Rare Books.






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20 February 2017

Caulfield Library reopens


Caulfield Library has reopened via a temporary entrance from the arcade level 1 tunnel between Buildings A and B. 




A bank of brand-new Macintosh computers
Following a three-month closure over summer, Caulfield Library has reopened via a temporary entrance at street level, across from Monash Connect. A temporary ramp is available for wheelchair access.

Approximately half the total space is now open for use, including 500 seats and open access to collections.

When completed, the library will have a total of 1500 seats.

Study and teaching spaces


Wireless is available and students can use their devices. The computers on levels 2, 3 and 4 can be used beginning Monday 27 February, including a large number of brand new Macintosh computers.

There are five discussion rooms for group work and these rooms will be available by Monday 27 February although they will not have AV capability yet. These rooms will be bookable after they have been fitted with technology (coming soon). Two more discussion rooms will be added when the rest of the library is opened.

Three large teaching rooms are located on level 1 and will be available from Monday 27 February. Initially, these rooms will only be accessible via a separate entrance from the Ian Potter Sculpture courtyard on the south end of Building A. Students should note that there will be no access to the rest of the library spaces from this area due to construction hoardings while builders complete the remaining works.

Borrowing


Staff and students can again request items from other campuses via Search and choose Caulfield Library as the pick-up location. Holds are now located on level 1 where the temporary entrance is. Please note: items on shelf at Caulfield cannot be requested for pick-up at the same library. Users should retrieve the items and borrow them at the Information point. From Tuesday 21 February, users can use the self-loan machines with their Monash ID.


Printing

Printing is now available from student mobile devices on the wireless network. Printing from the student computers will be available by Monday 27 February. The new Monash-wide M-Pass system is now live. Students release their print jobs / copy at the multi-function devices by using their Monash user name and password. Check 'how to print' instructions via the posters in the library or visit the website.



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25 January 2017

Matheson and Caulfield libraries set to re-open on 20 February

Both the Sir Louis Matheson and Caulfield libraries will reopen on Monday 20 February 2017 in time for Orientation Week. The summer closure of the two libraries has been extended to finish major building works.

Temporary borrowing arrangements are in place until the re-openings so that Monash staff and students can continue to borrow from both libraries.

Matheson Library

Caulfield Library 
  • Request items for pick-up at Room T103, Ground Floor, Building T from Monday to Friday, 8am - 6pm or at any of our other libraries.
  • Return items at Room T103 from 7am - 7pm during the week or anytime if you have swipe card access. You may also return items at any of our other libraries during library hours or the after-hours returns at Law Library at Clayton.
Critical functions such as the preparation of reading lists for Semester 1 units continue unimpeded. 

If you need advice from Library staff or have any questions, go to an Information point at any other library, through ask.monash.edu, or by telephone (03 9905 5054).

We apologise for the delays and ask for your patience through the final stages of these projects.


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10 January 2017

Caulfield Library to reopen on 20 February

Caulfield Library will be reopening on Monday 20 February 2017. The date has been pushed back due to some unexpected delays, while still providing early access for new and returning students preparing for Orientation and first semester. The final stages of work are expected to be completed by 21 March.



The temporary arrangements for the pick-up and return of items held at Caulfield Library will continue until 20 February. 

Monash staff and students and visitors should note that:


  • From 20 February to 9 March, the Library's temporary entrance will be from the arcade level 1 between Buildings A and B (opposite Monash Connect). A temporary ramp will be available for wheelchair access.
  • From 9 March, the Library entrance will shift permanently to the West entrance facing the Campus Green. The landscaping works will continue.


When it reopens, the Library will have three-quarters of the total space open for use, including the physical collections, study and teaching spaces. An initial five bookable discussion rooms will be available to students.

Upon completion when all corners of the Library are open, it will have:

  • 1500 seats for individual and group study
  • Seven bookable discussion rooms with technology
  • Four teaching rooms, including three large state-of-the-art teaching rooms
  • Study nooks
  • A café located inside the Library
  • More natural light and an inspiring interior
  • Artwork from the Monash collection
  • Shade house at the front extending four levels

Thank you for your patience during the refurbishment. Stay tuned for updates.









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3 January 2017

SAGE Research Methods Online

Undertaking research for a project is an exciting prospect - but it can also be intimidating, especially when starting out, says librarian Romney Adams. SAGE Research Methods Online (SRMO) is a powerful tool researchers can use throughout their journey - from familiarising yourself with methodological concepts via the Methods Map, to materials designed to inform your practice.


For new researchers, a fascinating place to begin is with the Methods Map - an interactive component of SRMO which allows you to ‘drill down’ to a set of methodologies that may best suit your needs. For example, perhaps you are undertaking a qualitative study, but are unsure of the data collection options available to you. Using the Methods Map, you can obtain an overview of a number of qualitative data collection methods - including ethnography, narrative research, and interviewing - and determine which may be best-suited to your needs. Or, perhaps you’d like to learn more about research design? Again, using the Methods Map, you can explore different research design theories and principles - including phenomenology, longitudinal research, and systematic reviews. You can choose to get a basic overview, or drill down to more specific information concerning these types of research design.

When beginning your research, you can move on and access some of the materials housed in SRMO. These include case study examples from researchers in the field, video tutorials showing chosen research methods in action, and full-text items. SRMO houses over 1,000 academic books, reference works, and journal articles, all with full-text online access - with a particular strength in the social sciences. To access these materials, enter your search terms into the simple box on the SRMO homepage - you’ll be able to tweak your search by specifying date ranges, material types, and other limiters once your results have been returned.

By running a simple search on ‘ethnography’, for example, you can then refine the returned materials by using the limiters. This will make the results more relevant to your needs - from ~4,000 items relating to ‘ethnography’, to ~150 eBooks relating specifically to ethnographic research in the field of education, published in the last 10 years. As you can see, a quick and easy way to be connected to high-quality materials!

If you think your search is complex, just use the Advanced option to use multiple terms and construct a more robust approach to exploring SRMO’s collections.

SAGE Research Methods Online can be found through Library Search, and Databases A-Z.

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1 December 2016

Writing in books: Marginalia in the Rare Books Collection

When you are reading for study or pleasure, do you underline words, highlight parts of the text or draw asterisks next to important lines? Do you write notes to yourself in the margin to clarify what you’ve just read or to remind yourself of an idea that the passage has brought up? If you are using an ebook or reading an article online, do you use the annotate tool to highlight passages or to create notes? Perhaps you annotate as a way of replying to the author or to question, approve, or refute his or her viewpoint.  If you do any of these things, you may not have realised it, but you have been engaging in the scholarly process of creating marginalia.  By Lauren Buchanan



Recently, a conference on marginalia - Marginal Notes: Social Reading and the Literal Margins - was held at the State Library of Victoria in conjunction with Monash University and University of Otago’s Centres for the Book. It included a masterclass where participants could bring and discuss examples encountered in their work or study, learn about different kinds of annotation, and consider the underlying meaning and significance of the practice. Attending the conference led me to consider the examples of marginal notes I have seen in the Rare Books Collection at Monash and pick out just a few favourites to share. These items are available for you to view in the Special Collections Reading Room at Sir Louis Matheson Library, Clayton. (Note: The library is currently closed, reopening on 30 January 2017.)

Marginalia is generally produced as part of the reading and studying process (Jackson, 2001) and can also serve a communicative function (Fajkovic & Björneborn, 2014). Annotations to the text can act as an imaginary conversation between the reader and the author, as well as initiating an ongoing conversation between subsequent readers of the marginalia. Once they have been written, “marginalia become physical artefacts, whose function is a constant and inseparable part of both the text and the physical book” (Fajkovic & Björneborn, 2014, p. 914).

In the realm of marginalia, there are many different kinds of markings. From an innocuous pencil underline of a keyword to the vertical line next to a paragraph indicating its importance; from an exclamatory “No!” scrawled by an outraged reader to an earnestly written argument debunking the author’s viewpoint in the margin of the page. Stars, asterisks, curly brackets, scribbles, doodles, sketches, even the elegant outline of a hand with a finger or fingers pointing to specific parts of the text, known as a manicule, are all marks of marginalia.

Decoding handwritten annotations

The first image is an example from one of our manuscripts, probably written in France during the eighteenth century. A professional scribe was employed to transcribe Jean de la Fontaine’s Transformation metallique, trois anciens tractez en rithme francoise (Paris: Guillaume Gillard, 1561) and an extract of Le roman de la rose by Jean de Meung (c.1240). The manuscript’s owner has interacted with the text by underlining important passages, inserting a curly bracket to emphasise another passage, writing extensive notes in the margins, and also excising large passages by crossing them out. The reader has also drawn a manicule in the left-hand margin, a name that comes from the Latin maniculum, meaning "little hand”. Manicules originated in the scribal tradition of the medieval and Renaissance period and functioned as punctuation marks to signal corrections or notes. They were later used as a printer’s typographical symbol to mark notes and also act as a means of signifying noteworthy passages and in advertising displays (Houston, 177).

The next item that caught my eye is an edition of Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s Du contrat social, ou, Principes du droit politique (Strasbourg: De l'Impr. de la Société typographique, 1791). Our edition has an ownership inscription on the front cover that reads, “A. Lewis Parkes” and contains a number of handwritten annotations. Unlike the previous example, in which marginalia accompanies the text throughout, the Rousseau edition has only been annotated on the front and preliminary papers and the endpapers. This particular example also highlights one of the problems inherent in decoding handwritten annotations. Sometimes, the handwriting is extremely difficult to read and its meaning and significance remains opaque. Interpreting marginalia can often prove a tantalising but frustrating and difficult task!

 The last two examples of marginalia are both connected to the author Jonathon Swift. This image is from a pamphlet with a rather interesting lineage. Swift’s pamphlet, The Presbyterians Plea of Merit (1733), attacked the Whig government for their intention to remove the Test Act for dissenters. We hold the anonymously printed reply to Swift’s pamphlet, entitled, A Vindication of the Protestant dissenters (Dublin, Powell: 1733), which contains handwritten notes penned by Jonathon Swift himself as he read the attack upon his work. Unfortunately, some notes were cropped in the binding process but we can immediately see some of his reactions in the margins, including his rebuttals of certain points. These comments were later reworked as part of Swift’s ironic reply, Reasons for repealing the Sacramental Test & c. in favour of the Catholics (1732).

The final example shows an anonymous commentator’s interaction with another of Swift’s pamphlets, The management of the four last years vindicated….(London: J Morphew, 1714). It was written by Swift as a reply to Charles Povey's An inquiry into the miscarriages of the four last years reign (London: Robinson, c.1714). As you can see, the commentator has drawn a manicule, signalling the importance of the passage. There are also underlinings, vertical lines to emphasise a paragraph, comments written next to the printed text, as well as copious notes at the foot of each page. Like previous examples, the handwriting here is difficult to decipher, rendering the task of interpretation problematic. However, for a student or researcher interested in either Swift or the historical period, grappling with difficult marginalia may provide a rich reward.

Studying marginalia can provide a deeper insight into an author and his or her readers as well give a greater appreciation of the wider context in which they wrote. Marginal notes and annotations help make an item unique and offer a glimpse into the lived experience of the book itself. They raise questions of provenance, use, and appreciation. In the digital landscape, we may question whether the process of creating marginalia will continue and what this means for the study of marginalia. We would love to see you in the Special Collections Reading Room deciphering these works or puzzling over other books with accompanying marginalia.



References

Fajkovic, M., & Björneborn, L. (2014). Marginalia as message: Affordances for reader-to-reader communication. Journal of Documentation, 70(5), 902–926. doi:10.1108/jd-07-2013-0096 

Houston, K. (2013). Shady characters: the secret life of punctuation, symbols, & other typographical marks. New York: W.W. Norton & Company.


Jackson, Heather J. (2001).  Marginalia: readers writing in books. New Haven: Yale University Press.






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24 November 2016

Matheson Library to close from 28 November

The refurbishment of the Sir Louis Matheson Library at the Clayton campus is on the homestretch. The library will need to close over summer to commence the remaining works and speed up other construction activities. 

Matheson Library will be closed from Monday 28 November and will reopen on 20 February 2017.

Items currently on hold in Matheson will remain in the library for collection until the close of business on Friday 25 November. On Monday all holds items will be transferred to Law Library as the new pick-up location.

During this period of closure, Monash staff and students can:
  • use Search to request items held at Matheson Library for pick-up at the Law Library. That will be arranged as soon as possible; you will receive an email when they are ready for collection. 
  • return items due at any other library except Caulfield; after-hours returns available at Law Library.
  • find study spaces at the two other libraries on the campus.
  • get advice and ask questions at an Information point at any other library, through ask.monash.edu, or by telephone (03 9905 5054).
Due to the closure, 'Matheson' will not be available as a pick-up location for inter-campus loans.

We apologise for this disruption and ask for your patience over the summer as the Matheson Library's refurbishment comes close to completion in semester 1 2017.


Visit the Library website for more information. If you have any comments or concerns about the Matheson Library refurbishment project, please email fsd.feedback@monash.edu.

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Welcome to the Monash University Library blog. Whether you are engaged in learning, teaching or research activities, the Library and its range of programs, activities and resources will contribute to your success. Here you will find useful information, ideas, tips and inspiration. Your comments on any of the articles are welcome.

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