Library

Showing posts with label digitisation. Show all posts
Showing posts with label digitisation. Show all posts

1 December 2015

All you need to know about reading lists and digitisation for your teaching

Reading lists created by the Library provide students with direct access to their essential recommended readings and can even be integrated with Moodle. Let the Library do the work for you!... by Adam Duke and Beth Pearson.



Who creates the reading lists?
The Library’s Readings and Reserve Services team works within the University’s seven libraries to create online reading lists using the Talis Aspire Software.

Aspire is currently used by 77 universities in seven countries worldwide.

When should I submit my reading list request to the Library?
Requests to create a reading list must be received at least four weeks before the start of the teaching period.

Submitting your requests early is important to enable your students to have access to the resources they need at the required time. Reading lists will be processed in the order in which they are received.

Minor updates and changes can be submitted any time during the year, by contacting the Readings and Reserve Services

How can students access the online reading list?
There are three simple ways:
  • Enter the unit code in Search.
  • Follow the reading lists link on the Library’s home page.
  • Visit the unit's Moodle page.
Moodle Integration
Library reading lists can now be integrated with Moodle and can be set to display from within the Moodle environment in a number of different ways. This
  • simplifies access for your students - no need to leave Moodle.
  • places the reading list resources in the most relevant section of their course unit pages.
Watch the video and contact your Faculty admin  to get started.

What are the benefits to students?
Online reading lists allow students to access all their unit readings from the one place throughout the teaching period.

Using the Aspire reading list software, students can:
  • view real time availability of the Library’s physical collection
  • gain direct access to online journal articles and databases
  • view digitised materials
  • login to add personal study notes and track their reading progress.

How does digitisation work?
The Library’s Digitisation Centre can reproduce works that are otherwise unavailable in a digital form. These digitisations are created under the provisions of Part VB of the Copyright Act (1968). The documents are stored in a central repository and made available to students via their online reading lists.

All digitisation requests are made via the Library’s Readings and Reserve Services.
When a digitisation request is received by the Library it will be checked to ensure it is copyright compliant.

What are the advantages of the Library’s digitisation service over faculty photocopying?
  • University copyright compliance
  • high quality, digital reproductions with increased functionality (searchable text, commenting, and highlighting enabled)
  • easily accessible online through unit reading list
  • track usage of digitised items via the Aspire software.

How long will a reading list, and any digitised content, remain online?
Reading lists, and any associated digitised content, will remain available online throughout the unit’s teaching and exam periods.

What happens to reading lists at the end of semester?
Reading lists and any digitised items will be archived to comply with University copyright regulations.

What happens if an item can’t be digitised?
Essential readings can be placed onto restricted loan by the Library to manage student demand through the teaching period. New materials can also be purchased upon request.

Around 1,000 reading lists are created each year so we encourage you to send your request to the Library as early as possible.

For further information, contact the Library’s Readings and Reserve Services.




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29 April 2015

WWII maps of Pacific preserved online

Monash University Research Repository has recently completed a mammoth project digitising   World War II maps and terrain studies....by Barbara Wojtkowski and Bronwyn Foott.


Terrain Studies - Repository
One of the AGS maps: Seeadler Harbour, Manus Island,
 Admiralty Islands, Papua New Guinea
Since Australian and New Zealand Forces landed at Gallipoli 100 years  ago, Australian Forces have taken part in many campaigns all over the world, including, during World War II, in the South West Pacific Area (SWPA) immediately north of Australia.

Monash University Research Repository has now digitised all Monash holdings of a critical geographic resource from that period, the Terrain Studies.

The South West Pacific was a key destination for Australian Forces, but unfortunately very little was actually known about it. After all, who had actually mapped all the island chains, all the numerous archipelagos and highlands? What were the conditions? Who lived there? Was there any food that could be found locally? What about diseases? And thousands of our young people were about to go into these areas to survive, fight and die. What to do?

In the background, away from the front line, an organisation called the Allied Geographical Service (AGS) was formed in 1942 with the task of remedying this situation. Its function was to prepare various ‘publications’ to address this lack of fundamental and critical information. Among the AGS’ publications were the Terrain Studies whose purpose was to cover a specified area as completely as possible from a military perspective. This they did under difficult conditions, with very limited resources, often with only three weeks’ notice. By the time of its dissolution in November, 1945, the AGS had produced 110 Terrain Studies.

The Studies themselves contain detailed text, photographs, diagrams, maps and often annotations, as new information came to hand; everything that could be found from every possible source in Australia and overseas in the time allowed. They were used in planning and later as the basis for another publication, the Terrain Handbooks, which had a wider distribution. These Terrain Studies have now been digitised in their entirety – each Study, the text, the photos, maps and diagrams in exquisite and intricate detail.

So, why are they so important? Why make a fuss about something which was used so far in the past?....  History, is one major reason. In addition to valuable academic research in the field, these resources may be useful to personal researchers who are tracing the last movements of relatives.

For use with a modern application, the maps and annotations are highly accurate. Their application to coastal change, climate change and related disciplines is unquestionable.


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About the Blog

Welcome to the Monash University Library blog. Whether you are engaged in learning, teaching or research activities, the Library and its range of programs, activities and resources will contribute to your success. Here you will find useful information, ideas, tips and inspiration. Your comments on any of the articles are welcome.

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