Library

Showing posts with label databases. Show all posts
Showing posts with label databases. Show all posts

29 March 2017

New architectural database: Explore by building type


Birkhäuser Building Types Online is a whole new way of searching for information on building types and specific projects, writes Romany Manuell, Subject Librarian for Art, Design and Architecture.


If you're an architecture student or researcher, you're probably familiar with many of the Library's database subscriptions. You've probably used Avery Index to Architectural Periodicals, and you certainly will have found articles using JSTOR. But have you tried Birkhäuser Building Types Online? This new database by the publisher De Gruyter has articles (just like those other databases) but also includes vector-based drawings, architectural plans, photographs and much more.

The main feature of Birkhäuser Building Types Online is that it allows you to explore by building type or morphological type, rather than just by keywords. If you're looking to browse office buildings, you'll find 67 of them currently listed - with more coming every day! If you choose to view a particular office building in the list, such as VPRO Villa by MVRDV, you’ll see site plans, professional photos of the exterior, and a brief description of the project.

However, if you were to search for the architectural practice MVRDV, you’ll see all the entries for individual projects (including VPRO Villa, Villa KBWW and Mirador Residential Complex). You’ll also find excerpts from books in the De Gruyter collection that mention the architectural practice. This will give you an excellent starting point for your research into building types and specific projects. Explore and enjoy!


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20 March 2017

Using academic resources - what and how

Most units you undertake at Monash will have a research component - usually in assessments, where you will be asked to support your work with academic resources. Knowing how and where to find such resources can be tricky, says Romney Adams, Subject librarian.


The good news is the Library has plenty of expertise in the area of academic resourcesand can work with you to build your research skills. Read on to discover tips that will make your journey into the world of academic research a little easier!

One thing that confuses a lot of students is understanding what an academic resource actually is. Most of us will have had no reason to look further than a textbook prior to studying at university - but you can’t just rely on your textbook for research! Articles in academic journals will often be the type of resource you’ll be looking for.

Some academic sources undergo a process known as peer review - you can find out more about the peer review process in this dino-tastic video, but essentially it means the article has been verified by independent experts in the field. Peer reviewed articles are sometimes known as ‘refereed’ articles.

Books can also be considered as academic sources. Most books you find in the Library will be considered ‘academic’ in the context of your discipline, but if you’re ever unsure, you can always ask a Librarian at the Research & Learning Point.

Okay, so you know what academic resources are...now you just need to find them! While the Library has far less physical items than it used to, we have an abundance of academic materials online - including journal articles and eBooks. We recommend using Search, the Library’s resource discovery tool, as a launching point for your research - this will give you a great overview of the literature that’s available, and you’ll be able to find plenty of materials to get you started. Once you’ve used Search, it’s best to then look at some subject-specific databases. These databases contain even more materials - many of which you won’t be able to find using Search! The Library has a Guide to databases that are particularly useful for your discipline. Of course, there’s nothing quite like getting hands-on and browsing the shelves - if you have the time - you never know what gem you may stumble across!

Getting used to searching for academic resources takes time, patience, and practice. If you feel frustrated, confused, or just want to make sure you’re on the right track, chat to a Librarian at your Library’s Research & Learning Point, or book into a workshop. Together, we’ll ensure you’re finding the right kind of sources for your assessments as quickly and easily as possible.


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17 March 2017

High tech and emerging company and industry information

The Library has recently subscribed to two specialist databases which expand your options when researching rapidly evolving companies and industries, says David Horne, Business and Economics Librarian. 


Need in-depth intelligence on global pharmaceuticals, or other high tech markets?

BCC Research provides detailed market research reports covering the range of high technology sectors, including but not limited to, biotechnology, advanced materials, energy, food and beverage, health care and pharmaceuticals.

Need to have up-to-date news and data on Uber and similar emerging companies?

CB Insights
closely tracks emerging and evolving tech companies, including their performance, financing, industry trends and competitors. Once you have registered and accessed CB Insights, click the toolbar Help and view: “What can I do with CB Insights?” for a useful introduction.

The specialist focus and content of these new subscriptions complements the Library's existing key company and industry information sources including: DatAnalysis Premium, IBIS World, MINT Global, Passport and MarketLine Advantage.

Access them via the Company and Industry library guide: or via the Databases A-Z menu from the Library home page.

Can’t find the data you need? Consult your library’s Research & Learning Point or local Faculty Team librarian





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1 March 2017

Solve agricultural and environmental problems with scientific knowledge


Science librarians, David Smith-Chitty and Madeleine Bruwer, introduce this new resource in the fields of agriculture and applied life sciences.




CAB Abstracts is the leading database for applied life scientists performing research in animal health and production, biofuels, biosafety and bioterrorism, climate change and environmental sciences, ecotourism, invasive species and horticultural sciences and more. With a focus on solving problems on a globalised but local scale, CAB Abstracts is a tool to find practical solutions for issues in the applied life sciences.

CAB Abstracts is produced by CABI (Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International), an international non-profit organisation, with development and research projects around the world. The database has an international focus with publications from over 120 countries, including developing countries, and in 50 languages.

CAB Abstracts contains more than 8.3 million records from 1973 onwards and keeps increasing with over 360,000 new abstracts added each year. In addition, Monash University has access to 1.8 million records dating back to 1910 via CAB Abstracts Archive.

Build a sophisticated search using the CAB Thesaurus, which allows users to utilise specific terminology for all covered subjects (including plant, animal and microorganism names), across different languages (Dutch, Portuguese and Spanish equivalents are available for most English terms). Filter search results by organism descriptors based on terms used, timeframe, location, full text availability and publication type.

Register for a MyCABI account to save your search history and receive email alerts for your favourite searches. Organise your searching with the My Projects feature which will sort your searches and results into separate folders based around specific research topics and focuses.

To access the CAB Abstracts database select the CAB Direct online platform from our A-Z database listing.

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13 February 2017

Track the evolution of legislation

Did you know we have Law databases that will help you research the history of legislation? Subject Librarian Caroline Knaggs says it's handy and really easy to use.


Are you researching the history of legislation? TimeBase databases will help you with you research. Just select the area you wish to research and the date(s) you are investigating, TimeBase will do the rest!

TimeBase has point-in-time services in Australian corporations, competition and consumer law, employment, GST, income tax and intellectual property law.

You can:

  • Create complete legislation pictures based on the date you are researching at any date - past, present or future
  • Access comprehensive, date-sensitive related materials linked at the relevant date
  • Instant comparison of versions of provisions as they were at different dates
  • Access version history of all sections, across all versions, irrespective of legislative instrument
  • Search for legislative material related to a problem occurring at a certain date - past or future.

TimeBase also produces LawOne, which gives comprehensive national legislation coverage in Australia. LawOne has over 65,000 legislative items, access to full text legislation across all nine jurisdictions. It includes amending, subordinate and repealed legislation, Bills, Explanatory Memoranda and Second Reading Speeches along with detailed legislative histories.

These databases can be accessed through Library Search, and our Databases A-Z pages.

To discover more resources to research legislation go to the Law Resources Library Guide.


Please contact Law Library staff if you would like more details or need help in using these databases.




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1 February 2017

Women’s Letters and Diaries databases

The two resources featured here provide a valuable way to see into the past, says Melanie Thorn, Subject Librarian. 



Mary Queen of Scots is one of hundreds of writers whose
experiences are published here. 
British and Irish women's letters and diaries: 1500 to 1950, and its companion North American women's letters and diaries: colonial to 1950 are databases that reveal the personal experiences of over 400 British and more than 1300 North American women from various historical eras.

For example, the American database includes the story of Loreta Janeta Velazquez, who enlisted in the confederate army as Harry T. Buford in the 1870s. She wrote of her experiences in battle and as a Confederate spy, and her arrest for ‘being a woman in disguise’. "There was, evidently, something suspicious and mysterious about me; and, suspicion having once been excited, some lynx-eyed detective was not long in noting certain feminine ways I had, and which even my long practice in figuring as a man had not enabled me to get rid of." [1] 

Not only does the story point out that women fought in the Civil War, but provides insight into cultural and social understandings of women and femininity.

Gerda Lerner, an American historian who was involved in the creation of the first graduate program in women’s history in the United States, was unimpressed at the lack of interest in the topic when she entered academia in the mid 1960s.  “In my courses, the teachers told me about a world in which ostensibly one-half the human race is doing everything significant and the other half doesn’t exist.” [2] This was replicated in terms of research, with Lerner noting that the number of historians interested in women's history “could have fitted into a telephone booth”. [3]

Thankfully this has changed, but primary sources written by women can still be difficult to find and this is what makes these databases so valuable.

The search tool in these databases is incredibly powerful and allows you to easily search for very specific content, for example, content written by widowed women who lived in New York city in the 1860s, or for women who were writing about a particular historical event, like the bombing of Pearl Harbour. A good example of the latter is the American, Natalie Stark Crouter, who was confined in a Japanese civilian camp in the Philippines with her businessman husband and their two children throughout World War II.

She writes,  "After the children left for school, we turned on the radio about 8:15 -- and heard of the attack on Pearl Harbor. While listening, we heard planes and went out as usual to see them. Almost over the house, quite high, came seventeen big bombers in formation. We could see them plainly and thought they were American. I remarked, "Well, we probably won't be standing here looking up at planes like this much longer. As they passed almost opposite the house, we heard a long ripping sound like the tearing of a giant sheet and saw an enormous burst of smoke and earth near officers' quarters at Camp John Hay -- the first bombing of the Philippines before our eyes." [4]

In addition to the raw material like this, the database also includes biographies of many of the authors, providing the context of people who would otherwise be little known in history.

The two Diaries and Letters databases are available through Library Search, and the Databases A-Z. Please contact your subject librarian if you would like more details or help in using the databases: Melanie Thorn (Clayton) or  Rod Rizzi (Caulfield).

To discover more primary source databases for history see the Primary Sources library guide.






[1] Loreta Velazquez, The Woman in Battle: A Narrative of the Exploits, Adventures, and Travels of Madame Loreta Janeta Valazquez, Otherwise Known as Lieut. Harry T. Buford, Confederate States Army, (Hartford, CT: T. Belknap 1876) 278,  [accessed 10 January]

[2] William Grimes, ‘Gerda Lerner, a Feminist and Historian, dies at 92’, The New York Times, 3 January 2013 [accessed 16 January 2016], (para 4 of 24)

[3] Grimes, New York Times

[4]Natalie Stark Crouter, Forbidden Diary: A Record of Wartime Internment, (New York, NY: Burt Franklin & Co. 1980) , [accessed 10 January]

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23 January 2017

Statista – a new source of data

Subject Librarian David Horne tells us in this article about an online statistics portal that can provide very useful information for many areas of research.  



Statista is a portal for data relevant to business, economics, media and social topics, with international coverage. Its content, ease of use and range of output options make it a key Library resource to consult when seeking data for written assignments, presentations and lectures.

The data encompasses statistics, forecasts, industry reports, dossiers (topic overviews), studies, and infographics. Statista’s intuitive search interface provides easy sorting and filtering of results, and links to the information providers for a given search result.  An example of the kind of clear information Statista provides is given in the graph below showing the change in the number worldwide Internet users between 2006 and 2016.

Data can be customised using Statista’s style options, and exported in PNG, XLS, PDF or PPT formats. This allows easy inclusion of images and data from Statista in presentations and documents.

Access Statista from its record in Search, or from the Databases A-Z menu. http://guides.lib.monash.edu/subject-databases


Can’t find the data you need? Consult your library’s Research & Learning Point or local Faculty Team librarian. http://www.monash.edu/library/skills/contacts


An example of a Statista graph, available to Monash staff and students.






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2 December 2016

ASTM online standards collection

Hilary Luxford, subject librarian, explains how to use the ASTM online standards available through the Library's databases.


Standards in  materials are important in construction 
A range of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) publications is available to staff and students. After logging in through the Library’s ASTM Digital Library, users need to create their own profile to use these particular collections, ASTM standards through 'IHS Standards Expert' and a wide range of other ASTM publications through the 'Digital Library' interface.

About American Society for Testing and Materials

ASTM, began in 1898 and has become one of the largest standard bodies with offices worldwide, now known as ASTM International, written by experts for experts. ASTM standards and allied publications main users are from the engineering fields which include: aerospace, biomedical, chemical, civil, environmental, geological, health and safety, industrial, materials science, mechanical, nuclear, petroleum, soil science and solar engineering but also used by other STEM disciplines.

Why do we need standards?

“Standards are documents setting out specifications, procedures and guidelines”.  Forty percent of ASTM standards are updated annually, and now Monash staff and students can access the latest standards 24/7, anywhere from lab or home. Formerly, researchers had to visit the Library to consult individual volumes, which because of their value, could not be removed from the Library, copyright law would not allow users to scan or photocopy the entire standard.

Users are now able to access the active standards online, and download a copy for their research and study purposes.

Two different platforms

ASTM standards (1931 to present) can be searched also from the 'Digital Library' interface which has useful features for searching exclusive to this interface. If searching for standards for a particular area, where the title/number is unknown, the 'Digital Library' search interface may be more effective, but also a reconnection to 'IHS Standards Expert' will be required to access the full-text of the 'active' standards. One of the peculiarities of this platform is that to access ‘IHS Standards Expert’ will require you to log out, log in again and go to the ‘IHS Standards Expert’ heading in order to access the full text of the standards.

About the ASTM Digital Library

ASTM Digital Library is accessed by choosing ASTM Digital Library, then Digital Library after logging in and registering. ASTM Digital Library provides full text to a range of publications including:
  • eBooks and manuals
  • symposia papers, and peer reviewed papers known as 'Special Technical Papers' which address the latest research from which the standards are developed
  • journals
  • data series
  • bulletins containing technical papers
  • retrospective proceedings (1909-1965).
Hover the mouse over these publications to see a description of the publication.

In addition, the ASTM Digital Library interface searches but does not provide full-text to the ASTM standards, but the search features unique to this interface such as the ‘Refine the results’ options may be advantageous if the user wants to explore standards by combining one or more of the following :
  • category such as materials, properties, test methods and the like
  • technical committee – these specialise in areas such as ‘Corrosion of Metals’ that produced the information in the publications eg. Corrosion of Metals, Concrete and Concrete Aggregates
  • topic eg. consumer product safety and evaluation
  • industry sector, such as ‘building and construction’, ‘mining and mineral processing’
  • date range.
These same filters/options for refinement can be combined to search for the other publication types available on this interface as outlined previously.

In addition to the ‘Refine your results’ options outlined, these filters can be combined or searched separately with the search box located above labelled 'ASTM Compass'. This enables search functions such as search for keywords within a type of publication or you may choose the ‘Advanced Search’ to search within Titles, abstracts or the full text

The ‘Advanced Search’ is useful for searching for known elements of a particular publication eg. DOI, author details, which can be combine with keywords

Searching ASTM standards accessed from the ASTM IHS interface


Here you can locate and access the ASTM standards in full-text for ‘active’ standards. Retrospective standards can be searched on this interface, but only the record will be provided. A search option for a known standard, "ASTM C1582/C1582M-11 Standard Specification for Admixtures to Inhibit Chloride-Induced Corrosion of Reinforcing Steel in Concrete” could be simply searched by the prefix ‘ASTM C1582’ in the document number box. After locating the record, you can view the ‘Document Details’ tab where you can view ‘Document abstract’, Document history which shows the earlier and
current versions. The full-text of active standards can be accessed by scrolling down to the ‘Document History’ and clicking on the blue page icon , or alternatively choosing the ‘View Document’ tab at the top of the screen. To locate standards that reference or relate to your standard, eg., "ASTM C1582/C1582M-11”, choose the ‘Related Documents’ tab.

Also from the ‘IHS interface’ you can also search within titles, abstracts, and within the full-text, referred to as ‘All document text’. Another key feature of this interface is the ability to alert users to the when a particular standard has been updated, referred to as ‘Watch list’.

Getting help

Please contact your subject librarian if you would like any further details:
  • Ms Nhan Le, subject librarian for Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering. Email: Nhan.Le@monash.edu
  • Ms Hilary Luxford, subject librarian for Civil Engineering, Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering, Materials Engineering. Email: Hilary.Luxford@monash.edu
To find out more about standards resources at Library refer to the Standards guide.

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3 November 2016

The Lyell Collection – a wealth of valuable Earth Science resources

Jennifer Kain, Subject Librarian, lets  us know about a specialist geology resource, that includes information from the early nineteenth century.

Named after Charles Lyell, the eminent nineteenth-century geologist, the Lyell Collection is a highly regarded and comprehensive online collection from the Geological Society (London).  It includes journal titles, Special Publications & Memoirs, along with key Book series and material published on behalf of other related societies.

Cutting edge science sits alongside important historical material, all captured and presented via the HighWire Press platform, and available to us as HTML or high quality PDF.

Content, from 1811 onwards, covers a wide range of topics in the Earth Sciences, including; Geology, Hydrogeology, Geochemistry, Palaeontology, Geo-engineering, Petroleum, Mining, Environment, Climate, Volcanology, Planetary sciences and many other related areas of interest to Monash reserchers.  You might be surprised to find what gems could be discovered!  Try a search on your own topic.

For each item found you may also discover fully linked references embedded, enabling users to navigate from the original journal article to other cited references.  These may also be available in full-text if these cited references are part of our wider HighWire Press collections, or be available as part of another Monash subscription.

Lyell Collection is an excellent resource for the Earth Sciences in particular, but includes some valuable material for the wider Science/Engineering areas as well.  Enjoy exploring the Lyell Collection from the Monash University Library.

Contact the Subject Librarian with any enquiries.  jennifer.kain@monash.edu

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1 September 2016

Migration to new worlds

Migration to New Worlds is a digital primary source collection that explores the journeys of 19th and early 20th century immigrants from around the world to the United States, Canada and Australasia. ... by Melanie Thorn



'Canada Docks', 1860, watercolour. 
Most of the material is from the period 1800 to 1924, the ‘Century of immigration’, and comes from institutions in the U.S., U.K. and Canada, with a small number of items from Museum Victoria and the Maritime Museum of Tasmania included. The material incorporates Colonial Office files, manuscripts, watercolours, rare printed books, ship logs and plans, legal papers, maps and scrapbooks, and objects related to migration. There is also a significant collection of first hand accounts in the form of letters, diaries and oral histories. The database includes an interactive Migration Map which allows you to analyse and visualise migration trends using data from around the world, and also provides some secondary research aids such as the biographies of major immigrant agents and Tasmanian migrant stories. Content can be discovered by browsing thematic areas such as ‘Motives for Emigration’, ‘Departures: Port Conditions and Organisation’ and ‘Journey Conditions’, or browsing or searching the Documents, Galleries, and Oral History sections. Migration to New Worlds is available through Library Search and the Databases A-Z. For other primary source databases, the Primary Sources for Humanities Library Guide is a great place to start!



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12 August 2016

Engage your students with high quality images



We live in an increasingly visual culture, where a powerful image can be an effective way to create engagement with teaching presentations and elearning content. A quick trawl of the web would suggest that loads of visual materials are available freely at your fingertips, but these may not necessarily be academically sound or of high quality. Carlie Nekrasov breaks down how to find images through the Library's database.




Some of the questions to ask before using a random image in an academic context include;
  1. What are the copyright requirements? i.e. what are the terms/conditions associated with using particular images?
  2. How do I cite and reference them?

There is a better way

Forget about attempting to navigate these questions via a Google Images search. The library provides access to hundreds of thousands of high resolution images within databases that have been copyright cleared for educational use (which means they can be used for teaching purposes or within moodle sites, just not in a wider context such as in publications and/or open access materials). We have also created a dedicated Digital Images Library Guide.


Once you bookmark these resources it becomes easier to source images for teaching purposes as you are not required to hunt down permissions and agreeable terms/conditions.




The Digital Images library guide is a whole guide dedicated to the use of images within the academic environment, so dive in and take a look here. It is a treasure trove for researchers and teachers, including information on image search engines, databases, open access images, citing images, tools for editing and how to comply with copyright.

Explore the library’s most extensive image databases:
ARTstor is a stellar image database containing an extensive collection of millions of images from 290 collections around the world. So if you are putting together a presentation on ancient cultures, ARTstor has you covered with a high resolution image of an ancient Egyptian mural painting circa 1400 B.C.


Other gems available via this database include; Kandinsky paintings, photographs of Andy Warhol’s brillo boxes and classical medieval manuscripts to name just a few. Along with arts subjects there is also access to images related to science and technology, geography, and many more subject areas. The keyword searching feature helps you to refine your results, and the easily exportable citations in various styles and functions enable you to use it with PowerPoint and embed image details with captions directly into your presentations.


Click here to explore the database.


Bridgeman Education provides access to over 1.2 million digital images ready for you to use and copyright cleared for educational use. Some of the subject areas include art, history and culture from global museums, galleries, private collections and contemporary artists.


Click here to explore the database.



Further help?

Contact the MADA Subject Librarian or the Copyright Advisor for further advice on where to find images and how to use them when creating academic materials.


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10 August 2016

Academic resources: Navigating the databases


Your assessments take all kinds of different forms - variety is the spice of life, after all! The requirements can sometimes seem a little confusing - especially if one assessment asks you to use ‘academic’ sources, another ‘scholarly’ sources, and a third ‘refereed’ sources. What do all these terms mean? And where can you find such sources? The Library's Romney Adams is here to untangle the terminology, and hone your detective skills...


First of all: ‘Academic’, ‘Scholarly’, and ‘Refereed’ sources all mean the same thing. Remember how I mentioned that variety is the spice of life? These three terms just mean that your lecturer or tutor are after sources that have undergone something called Peer Review. This is a strict editorial process which ensures material published in academic journals is of a high standard, and suitable for others (such as yourself!) to cite and use in your own research and writing. If you'd like to know more about what Peer Review actually involves, check out this short video from North Carolina State University (it features dinosaurs!). When people speak about academic sources, people often think primarily of journal articles. But books can also be academic sources. Many students enjoy the convenience of being able to access and read journal articles online, but academic books can also be a great resource - particularly if you're new to a discipline, or unfamiliar with a certain area of research. However, textbooks are not typically used as evidence (in-text citations) to support arguments in your assessments. Of course, each of Monash’s libraries house thousands of physical books on our shelves, but many are also available as eBooks, which you can read online. Ask at your Library’s Information Point if you're unsure how to use Search to find eBooks, and check out this video to build your skills in being able to determine whether the source you’re using is an academic resource. If you like, you can test your knowledge with this interactive tutorial.
Nothing in life is free, and the same is true for journal articles (well, unless it’s published in an Open Access journal). Have you ever found the perfect article for your assessment in Google Scholar, only to be asked to pay to read it? It's very annoying, but the good news is that as students of Monash, the Library pays the access fees for you!
We subscribe to literally thousands of databases which give you access to academic collections, including journal articles and eBooks. With so many databases to choose from, it can be tricky to know where to start - but don't be overwhelmed! To ease into things, use Library Search, our resource discovery tool which searches our physical and online collections. You should be able to find some great academic resources to get you started, and when you're ready to build on this, you can start searching individual databases. Databases hold discipline-specific resources, and are reviewed and updated by your Subject Librarians and Electronic Access Librarians throughout the year, so you can be sure you'll be searching (and retrieving!) the content that is most useful for you. We love databases so much, that we even blog about them sometimes!
We suggest starting with Search, but it doesn’t retrieve results from every single resource we subscribe to, so make sure you’re researching thoroughly by searching directly in databases too. To determine which databases will be useful for you to use, head to the Library Guide for your discipline (e.g. Biology, History, Commercial Law).



Search and our subscribed databases hold a variety of resources - not all of them are academic, so it is important you build your skills in information evaluation to make sure you’re using the right materials to support your own arguments and claims in your assessments. Review the clip embedded above to get started, or chat to a librarian at your Library’s Research & Learning Point - they’ll be able to put you on the right track! Or, if you want to go more in-depth, check the Library Class Booking System for workshops on effective searching.
Photo 1 from: https://www.pexels.com/photo/startup-planning-notes-mac-book-7357/Photo 2: Screenshot from following video: http://www.monash.edu/library/transforming-libraries/matheson-video



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29 July 2016

Find your chemical information in ACS Publications

ACS Publications, including Sci Finder,  are the go-to resources for any research involving  chemistry, writes Nhan Le, a subject librarian from the Library's Science faculty team.

It has been said that chemistry, within our own times, has become a central science, from which all things emanate, and to which all things return*. The American Chemical Society (ACS) concurs with this mantra.

Monash University Library subscribes to all ACS Publications.  The database consists of:
  • Journals  -  nearly 50 peer-reviewed journals contain cutting-edge articles across a broad spectrum of scientific disciplines. The ACS began the publication of chemical research with the Journal of the American Chemical Society in 1879.
  • Chemical & Engineering News  - the weekly trade magazine
  • eBooks - the peer-reviewed ebooks contain essential research conducted by the world's leading scientists across all disciplines and applications. They now include more than 1,400 titles developed from ACS-sponsored symposia. Approximately 30 new ebooks are published each year.
Selected features
  •  Browse the Journal  - this option allows researchers to browse the journal via either “List of Issues”, or precisely select a specific issue of interest via the option “Select Decade”, “Select Volume”, then “Select Issue”
  •  Article ASAP (As Soon As Publishable),  that are edited and published online ahead of issue
  • Graphical abstracts, which are displayed on the journal table of contents
  • SciFinder database,  that can be accessed directly on the article level.
Also, when searching in SciFinder, if a graphical abstract is displayed on the search results page, researchers can be sure that the reference is one of the ACS journal articles. Therefore researchers can access it electronically.

You can access all the scholarly material on ACS Publications through the Library-managed subscription - via Search or the Databases - chemistry page.

ACS Publications and Figshare

As ACS Publications partners with Digital Science’s Figshare** to promote open data discovery and use, the scientific community can expect to retrieve chemistry-related datasets on the Figshare research data management tool.


*The Literary and Scientific Repository, and Critical Review, vol. 2, p. 221,
**ACS news release, 2015 

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3 June 2016

History, culture and politics in Russia and the Soviet Union

From Comrade Stalin to President Putin, you can access a compilation of Russian media articles translated into English through this unique database, says Anna Rubinowski, Subject Librarian for Slavic Studies.


Since its first publication in 1949, the Current Digest of the Russian Press, formerly published under the title Current Digest of the Soviet Press (1949-1991), and The Current Digest of the Post-Soviet Press (1992-2010), has provided a representative selection of Russian language press materials translated into English on all aspects of Russian history, culture and politics.

As a digest it offers a weekly compilation of articles that illustrate the topics of interest discussed in the Russian press. In this aspect it is a unique source for original material usually only available for Russian language speakers, as articles are translated into English as close as possible to the original Russian and without any elaborations or commentary added. This makes it one of the few sources available for English language speakers to access the Russian point of view, not only in regards to current issues but also in the historical perspective.

Established during a time when information from the USSR was inaccessible to the rest of the world, the digest became an essential resource for news from the Soviet Union and provided access not only to newspaper articles but also to significant speeches, documents from all meetings of the Communist Party Congresses, all five-year plans, and important Soviet laws and foreign policy development. It still continues to publish articles on economics, politics, foreign policy, international affairs, social and legal issues, public health, and culture.

Available on the East View databases platform, the interface is easy to navigate and content can be discovered through browsing individual issues of the digest or by searching for particular names or topics.

The Current Digest of the Russian Press is available through Library Search and Databases A-Z. If you are after more analytical or scholarly material, the Slavic Studies Library Guide is a great starting point for your research on Eastern Europe, Russia and the Soviet Union. Use the guide to access resources such as the American Bibliography of Slavic and East European Studies, the Stalin Digital Archive, and other English and Slavic languages materials.

Please contact Anna Rubinowski, Ada Booth Librarian and Subject Librarian for Slavic Studies, if you have any questions.



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19 April 2016

Creating a thorough search strategy

Finding every possible article relevant to a particular research topic is something that researchers and graduate research students may need to do. Get some expert tips on how to go about it from Subject Librarian Tracey Whyte.



Photo: Got Credit
When conducting research you may be wondering: Has this research been conducted previously? Have I reviewed all the literature on this discipline? Have I retrieved the most recent research conducted? Are there gaps in my research?

One way to resolve these questions is to plan a search strategy. A search strategy is a systematic method of searching for information. There are a few steps in this process.

Step 1
Prepare your search strategy by first brainstorming what you know about the topic already, defining terms or identifying particular resources to include.

Step 2
From the keywords you’ve hopefully identified already, think of similar words or phrases and group the similar terms together. This will broaden your search as you can choose from these alternative words if you can’t find information using the one term provided. Steps 1 and 2 are described in more detail in the ‘Developing a search strategy’ section of the Graduate Research Library guide.

Step 3
Next, test your search strategy across relevant Library databases or search tools. You can access Library databases from the Database Library guide or from the Databases tab on other subject Library guides. Highlight relevant resources and read the information about the resource from the abstract or summary and select relevant records to review more closely.

Step 4
Another useful tip to guide your searching is to identify the subject terms in the record. The subject terms are terms the database uses to describe what the article is about. You can replace your keywords with these subject headings to broaden or narrow your search. You may find alternative subject headings that are relevant so include those in your search too.

At right is an example of subject terms displayed in a complete record. This process of identifying terms, testing in a database and identifying subject headings relevant can be repeated until you have enough relevant information. Most search strategies use a combination of subject heading and keyword searching so use the method that retrieves the most relevant results.

Remember you may not be able to find all this information in one search, you might need to break down the components of the topic further into several searches or try a combination. There will be trial and error before you perfect your strategy.

Step 5
Lastly, you may also find it useful to create saved searches or alerts particularly if you will be viewing resources at another time or reusing the search. Login to the database or search tool to be able to save the search. Follow the database prompts and check the search tool or database Help screens for more information about how to do this. You can save and retrieve your searches as long as you sign in.

Need more information? The Library has also developed a comprehensive, interactive tutorial to guide you in the search process and don’t forget you can contact your subject librarian for advice about developing a systematic search strategy.



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4 April 2016

How do I use document delivery?

The Monash University Library collection provides you with access to over four million items, but did you know that as a staff member, honours or postgraduate student you can access even more? Read on to find out about document delivery and interlibrary loans… by Catherine Hocking.



Does this situation sound familiar?

You are searching your favourite database and come up with a list of amazing articles that are just perfect for your literature review - but wait, no full text coverage! Luckily our document delivery service has you covered.

What do I need to know?

Document delivery is a service for Monash staff, postgraduate and honours students allowing you to access the materials you need for your research, whether they be articles, conference papers, books, audiovisual and other materials.

You can request a copy or loan of items not held at a Monash branch library, or items that are missing from our collection. Copies of articles, chapters etc. from items that Monash only holds in print can also be supplied.

How do I use Document delivery?

The easiest way to request an article or paper is right at the point of discovery - when you are doing your database search. Many databases will have a ‘Check for full text’ button when an article is not available. Using this will first check other holdings in the Library’s Search (remember to Sign in!), and if still not available can link you through to a Document delivery request form with the article details ready filled. Check that the article details have populated correctly then submit your request - simple as that!


You can also fill out a request manually, for example if you need a book or something else not found through a database. Access the form through the Document delivery and interlibrary loans website, select your request type then enter as much information as you can.

Remember - the more information you can give us, the quicker we can process your request. Including an ISSN (for journals) or ISBN (for books) is particularly helpful.

How long will it take?

Most articles are supplied within one week, loans within three weeks. This can vary depending on where and how we are obtaining material. Our recent collaboration with international institutions means that many article requests with full citation details can be delivered within two working days.

Copies will be delivered to you by email or physical items such as books are sent to your nominated Monash branch library for collection. Off-campus registered students and staff can have items sent to their home address or department location.

If you do require materials urgently, you should contact  Document delivery staff to discuss your requirements.

Want to find out more? Check out our Document delivery library guide or website.



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8 March 2016

MarketLine a major source of company data


MarketLine Advantage is useful to anyone studying business, international finance or globalisation, says David Horne, a subject librarian in the Business faculty team.


MarketLine is a leading producer of worldwide company, industry/market, and country information.
The MarketLine Advantage database provides extensive coverage via an intuitive interface which allows for both effective browsing and rapid pinpointing of required content. Its key components are:


·         More than 5,700 industry profiles, which include Porter’s Five Forces analysis;

·         Over 32,000 company profiles providing SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analyses, with separate sections of MarketLine Advantage focusing on company news, case studies and financial deals;

·         Country reports analysing the political, economic, social, technological, legal and environmental (PESTLE) situation in 50 major countries;

·         A Databases option, where various types of customised data, such as country statistics and fast moving consumer goods market analytics, can be generated from the data sets in MarketLine Advantage.

While some MarketLine reports are accessible via other interfaces (e.g. Business Source Complete) these represent only a small fraction of the content of MarketLine Advantage. You may also have known these reports by their former brand, Datamonitor.

MarketLine Advantage will be of interest not just to Business School staff and students but potentially to anyone studying aspects of globalisation, and the global marketplace.

Access MarketLine Advantage from:



If you have questions or comments about using MarketLine Advantage, contact a librarian in the Library Business and Economics Team

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1 February 2016

Art Source: A gallery of resources for art, design and architecture research

Art Source is the go-to database for research in art or architecture, writes Romany Manuell, subject librarian for Art, Design and Architecture.


Have you heard about Art Source?  There’s no other database with as much high-quality content for your art, design and architecture research. Art Source is based on a merger of databases from EBSCO Publishing and H.W. Wilson, but it also includes a bunch of fresh, new sources never previously made available.

If you attended the MADA exhibition “The Abstract” last October, you’ll already be familiar with the peer-reviewed journals in our print collection. Did you know that many of those journals are also available online through Art Source? 

Art Source covers a broad range of related subjects, including:
  • Archaeology
  • Architecture and architectural history
  • Art history
  • Contemporary art
  • Costume design
  • Decorative arts
  • Folk art
  • Graphic arts
  • Industrial design
  • Interior design
  • Landscape architecture
  • Museology
  • Painting
  • Photography
  • Pottery
  • Printmaking
  • Sculpture
  • Television
  • Textiles
  • Video
Many of the articles in this database are full-text, but Art Source also provides detailed indexing and abstracts for journals, books, podcasts and more. If you’ve previously used the databases Art and Architecture Complete, Art Full Text or Art Index Retrospective, you’ll be happy to know that these are all now included in Art Source.

Art Source is available to Monash staff and students via the Databases page and through Search.

Be warned! Many people get Art Source confused with ARTStor. Both are excellent resources, but Art Source will give you top quality journal articles and art news, whereas ARTStor is an image library.

Art Source: your first stop for art, design and architecture research!











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7 December 2015

Multimedia resources to enrich your teaching

Have you wanted to engage students with relevant and interesting multimedia course materials, but concerned about copyright or felt you lack the technical skills?  Information research staff Carlie Nekrasov and Tracey Whyte have some suggestions.




The Multimedia Resources Library guide provides a gateway to subject specific and multidisciplinary video databases as well as tips for accessing, using and integrating them into your teaching.
  
The guide includes tips on how to:
  • Generate stable links for Moodle, reading lists, lecture slides
  • Save favourites into playlists 
  • Create clips for YouTube from selected databases
  • Link to or embed multimedia content
  • Understand copyright rules when using YouTube and other digital materials.
The following three resources provide a small sample of what is available through the Multimedia resources Library guide.

Resources available online

Alexander Street Press provides access to thousands of video and audio resources as well as texts across a wide range of disciplines, including film, music and performing arts, art and architecture, ethnographics, health and society, nursing and more. ASP includes contemporary as well as historical resources.

The collections available to Monash staff and students are listed under the 'My collections' link. You can also search by subject or topic, or browse by discipline. The Alexander Street Press platform offers you the flexibility to use entire videos, or to select segments or short clips.

 Photograph by Dennis Mayor 1972.
Courtesy State Library of Victoria

Detailed, step by step instructions are provided for:
  • Making a clip
  • Creating a playlist
  • Searching effectively 
  • Using the video player
  • Using the audio player 
Informit Edu TV is a TV online streaming resource that provides over 10,000 television programs to watch across a range of subject areas. You can also embed clips from the television programs into your course materials.

After setting up an individual registration to Informit EduTV you will be able to create a project file for storing your favourite shows, episodes and clips. After registering you will receive a username, and option to create a password, as well as information to help you search and create clips. You can read more about Informit EduTV in this Library blog post.

Kanopy provides a collection of around 26,000 documentaries and movies as well as selected television programs. You can for search for individual titles or browse subjects within Kanopy and individual titles are also available via Search. Further information about creating and managing clips and embedding excerpts in Kanopy can be found in this document.

Advice and tips

The Multimedia Resources Library Guide provides you with access to a world of audio, video and text resources to enhance your student’s learning experience. It provides tips on creating and maintaining a personalised set of playlists, and resources to guide you through creating clips and embedding these excerpts into your teaching materials. It even helps you find the right advice on copyright.
If you need further advice on how to best utilise these resources please contact the subject librarian in your relevant discipline or the copyright adviser.
  
The multimedia resources featured in the Multimedia Resources Library Guide are also available via Search and the Library Databases page.
  

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About the Blog

Welcome to the Monash University Library blog. Whether you are engaged in learning, teaching or research activities, the Library and its range of programs, activities and resources will contribute to your success. Here you will find useful information, ideas, tips and inspiration. Your comments on any of the articles are welcome.

If you believe that copyright material is available on this blog in such a way that infringes copyright, please contact our designated representative

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