Library

Showing posts with label Moodle. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Moodle. Show all posts

20 October 2016

Integrating Library guides into Moodle

Library guides showcase Library resources and collections by subject areas and/or provide a detailed guide to Library applications. 


Some lecturers have provided a link to a particular Library guide in their unit’s student reading list. Now, linking to a Library guide from your Moodle unit page is an equally useful way to encourage students to research a range of subject literature or use particular resources. By Tracey Whyte

Why should I integrate Library guides into my Moodle site?


Monash University Library staff have created over 100 Library guides, displaying a variety of topics as can be seen on Library guides website. Each individual guide is separate, allowing for easy linking or embedding of this content.

Like Moodle, Library guides permit:

  • easy navigation - information and applications or databases can be located and retrieved quickly 
  • easy collation of statistics to report usage or evaluate effectiveness
  • collaboration between Library and academic staff
  • content can be printed by students or staff
  • accessibility documents can be created.

There are three different types of Library guides:

1. Faculty and Subject Library guides.  Librarians and Learning skills advisers have created these over 100 of these popular guides across all faculties and linking to content in almost all subject areas taught at the University . Subjects covered in an individual guide cover such widely diverse topics as Indigenous health, Systematic reviews, Econometrics and Business statistics, Marketing, Industrial Design, Medieval and renaissance history, and Physics and Astronomy. The guides link to Library information research and learning skills content in a variety of multimedia formats. There may also be links to unit specific information or resources for particular cohort.

2. Collection and resources Library guides provide discovery and access to information and collections. Examples include the Library guides for Databases, Government Publications, Ada Booth Slavic collection  and the Map collection.

3. There are also instructional Library guides including for Citing and referencing, Endnote, Moodle and Turnitin.

How can a Library guide be incorporated into my unit?


While Library guides may be created to build students skills or knowledge of a discipline and some are aimed at researchers, academics can take advantage of these specialist resources for improved learning and teaching. Talk to your Subject Librarian or Learning Skills Adviser about incorporating Library guides in your units.

All guides are presented in a consistent, structured manner; content displayed can be presented in a variety of formats including text, links, tables, images, widgets, and from RSS or social media feeds. Other resources such as videos or learning objects, like the Academic Integrity module, can be embedded or linked in the platform.

Stay tuned for the next Teaching blog, ‘Discovering Library guides - supplement the resources in your unit Moodle sites’, which will continue this theme, provide practical tips and add more insights into the use of Library guides.

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1 December 2015

All you need to know about reading lists and digitisation for your teaching

Reading lists created by the Library provide students with direct access to their essential recommended readings and can even be integrated with Moodle. Let the Library do the work for you!... by Adam Duke and Beth Pearson.



Who creates the reading lists?
The Library’s Readings and Reserve Services team works within the University’s seven libraries to create online reading lists using the Talis Aspire Software.

Aspire is currently used by 77 universities in seven countries worldwide.

When should I submit my reading list request to the Library?
Requests to create a reading list must be received at least four weeks before the start of the teaching period.

Submitting your requests early is important to enable your students to have access to the resources they need at the required time. Reading lists will be processed in the order in which they are received.

Minor updates and changes can be submitted any time during the year, by contacting the Readings and Reserve Services

How can students access the online reading list?
There are three simple ways:
  • Enter the unit code in Search.
  • Follow the reading lists link on the Library’s home page.
  • Visit the unit's Moodle page.
Moodle Integration
Library reading lists can now be integrated with Moodle and can be set to display from within the Moodle environment in a number of different ways. This
  • simplifies access for your students - no need to leave Moodle.
  • places the reading list resources in the most relevant section of their course unit pages.
Watch the video and contact your Faculty admin  to get started.

What are the benefits to students?
Online reading lists allow students to access all their unit readings from the one place throughout the teaching period.

Using the Aspire reading list software, students can:
  • view real time availability of the Library’s physical collection
  • gain direct access to online journal articles and databases
  • view digitised materials
  • login to add personal study notes and track their reading progress.

How does digitisation work?
The Library’s Digitisation Centre can reproduce works that are otherwise unavailable in a digital form. These digitisations are created under the provisions of Part VB of the Copyright Act (1968). The documents are stored in a central repository and made available to students via their online reading lists.

All digitisation requests are made via the Library’s Readings and Reserve Services.
When a digitisation request is received by the Library it will be checked to ensure it is copyright compliant.

What are the advantages of the Library’s digitisation service over faculty photocopying?
  • University copyright compliance
  • high quality, digital reproductions with increased functionality (searchable text, commenting, and highlighting enabled)
  • easily accessible online through unit reading list
  • track usage of digitised items via the Aspire software.

How long will a reading list, and any digitised content, remain online?
Reading lists, and any associated digitised content, will remain available online throughout the unit’s teaching and exam periods.

What happens to reading lists at the end of semester?
Reading lists and any digitised items will be archived to comply with University copyright regulations.

What happens if an item can’t be digitised?
Essential readings can be placed onto restricted loan by the Library to manage student demand through the teaching period. New materials can also be purchased upon request.

Around 1,000 reading lists are created each year so we encourage you to send your request to the Library as early as possible.

For further information, contact the Library’s Readings and Reserve Services.




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29 January 2015

How to check your work before it is finalised

When you have finished writing your assignment and you think you're ready to submit it, you may want to do one final check. 

If your lecturer wishes you to submit assignments through Turnitin, they will have created a ‘Turnitin assignment drop-box’ in Moodle.

Turnitin is software which checks whether text in your assignment is too similar to that in your textbook or other references.

The software identifies passages of text in your assignment that are too similar to original texts that you have used. It is designed to allow you the opportunity to amend your work prior to submission.

The Turnitin Library Guide is provided to help you. It demonstrates how to access and use Turnitin and provides FAQs on the process: 

The guide is divided into six sections:
  • What is Turnitin?
  • How do I use Turnitin?
  • The Originality Report
  • How do I increase originality?
  • Faculty policies, and
  • Frequently Asked Questions.
The Library provides this and other Library guides and online tutorials for you to use when preparing and presenting your academic work.

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15 January 2015

A Library guide to Moodle

Moodle, the learning management system used at Monash University, was upgraded to the newest version (2.7) in November, 2014...... By Heidi Binghay


While there are few changes to the 2.7 ‘look and feel’ of Moodle, students may notice some differences to features and functions. Highlights of these changes include:
  • A new assignment module offering group assignments and built-in originality declaration statements
  • The option to use the new ATTO text editor with improved equation editing functionality
  • The addition of anonymous forums.
A new Moodle Library guide has been developed to provide students with more information about the changes and their impact on the use of Moodle.
 
A quick start guide to Moodle version 2.7 is also available to download from within the Library guide.

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About the Blog

Welcome to the Monash University Library blog. Whether you are engaged in learning, teaching or research activities, the Library and its range of programs, activities and resources will contribute to your success. Here you will find useful information, ideas, tips and inspiration. Your comments on any of the articles are welcome.

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