Library

Showing posts with label Education. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Education. Show all posts

28 August 2017

APA - referencing with style, especially for Education

Are you stressing with assignments? To get great marks it is also really important to cite works and reference them well, says Irene Guidotti.


One of the most used and required referencing styles is APA (American Psychological Association) 6th referencing style. At Monash it is also the preferred citing and referencing style for the Education Faculty. It is based on two parts that you have to learn and create: a reference list and in-text citations, but there are several little rules to follow, and when you are in a hurry they can be hard to remember.

Fortunately, the Library is here to help you and offers a wide range of resources to help students (but also staff!) in producing the perfect reference in APA style.

A wonderful - and authoritative - tool is APA Style Central platform, a learning answer for scholars, that also includes videos and a comprehensive range of tools you can use whether you are just getting started or more experienced. The following are just some of them:
  • quick guides to remember APA style rules easily (e.g. use of colons, italics and how to create a reference list)
  • quizzes to test your knowledge and understanding
  • samples of references and papers essential to check how you are proceeding
  • templates to improve your citing and referencing and also to manage easily your references within your writing
  • search and browse thousands of journals (where a researcher could submit a finished paper)
The following additional Library resources will help answer any further queries you have with using APA style and applying it to your Monash assignments. Have a look below and good luck with your assignments!

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13 June 2017

Covidence - streamline your systematic review

Our medical librarians, Penny Presta and Anne Young, recommend that researchers doing a systematic review use a new online application called Covidence which  streamlines the process.


Systematic reviews are often associated with the field of medicine, where their use fosters evidence-based research and informs clinical decisions and treatments. Covidence is a web-based program designed to assist the article screening and data extraction processes of a systematic review.

Those with a good understanding of systematic review processes will find Covidence easy to navigate. It can be used by reviewers in a variety of disciplines including health, education and the social sciences and it is a recommended tool for Cochrane authors.

Access:

Covidence is now provided free for Monash researchers. Monash users can request access using their Monash email.

Key benefits:
  • Invite multiple reviewers to work on your review in real time
  • Seamlessly “import citations” from EndNote, or other reference manager tools
  • Record screening decisions and notes so disagreements can be easily resolved
  • Simply highlight and comment directly in your pdf to automatically populate your risk-of-bias tables
  • Use customisable data extraction forms
  • Integrate with RevMan for export of data files, tables and references. Data can also be exported to Excel or CSV.
Help:
All questions about Covidence can be directed to support@covidence.org, or by clicking the “?” icon directly from Covidence. 

The Covidence Knowledge Base contains a range of online videos and resources useful for those getting started.

To find out more about Systematic reviews read our Library blog article

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9 June 2017

Storytime for grown-ups


At 11am on Wednesday 24 May, we marked the 17th National Simultaneous Storytime. Libraries across Australia, including our own Berwick Library, organised storytime events to read The Cow Tripped Over the Moon by Tony Wilson and Laura Wood.



Of course, it’s usually public libraries and primary schools that participate in National Simultaneous Storytime, but Monash University and Federation University librarians at the Berwick Library decided to give it a go.

Why read picture books as adults?


Aside from delivering a well-earned break from assignment writing and exam revision, the storytime event provided an excellent opportunity to engage university students in various ways.

Students could unpack the themes and ideas behind the stories in a more critical and reflective way than young kids. The Cow Tripped Over the Moon, for example, is a story about perseverance and fortitude. Lane Smith’s It’s a Book, teaches children about print and digital media, while remaining quite cheeky. The value of books like Mem Fox’s Where’s the Green Sheep? can be recognised as expanding children’s vocabulary, while Jackie French’s Diary of a Wombat can teach kids how to maintain a schedule. Early twentieth-century farmyard tales, like Beatrix Potter’s Peter Rabbit stories, are parodied in Terry Pratchett’s Where’s My Cow?, a delightful story that sends up the lack of resonance between stories of animals, and the child readers who grow up in the city. Coming back to these stories as adults, and reading them with others, allows for new perspectives and meanings to emerge.

After the librarians read The Cow Tripped Over the Moon, students were invited to participate and read a picture book of their choice. As well as being highly entertaining, this provided students with an opportunity to practise public speaking and reading aloud in a relaxed, judgement-free environment. These presentation skills are necessary for oral presentations at university and, for education students, vital for the classroom.

DSC03418.JPG
Carlie Nekrasov (Federation University) and Zachary Kendal (Monash University) reading The Cow Tripped Over the Moon for National Simultaneous Storytime 2017.


Picture books at Monash University Library

During the storytime event, the Berwick Library picture books collection was showcased around the room, giving students a glimpse into a possibly undiscovered part of the collection.

The Matheson, Peninsula and Berwick libraries all have teaching materials collections filled with picture books, children’s literature, and all sorts of puzzles and games. These resources are ideal for education students needing materials for practicums or assignments.

Digging deeper


If you’re interested in digging deeper into children’s literature and picture books, you could take a look at some of the scholarly journals on the genre, available through the Monash University Library:

Children’s Literature
Bookbird
The Lion and the Unicorn
Children’s Literature in Education

Monash also teaches two units on children’s literature: ATS2519 Children's literature: A comparative study, and EDF3032 Children's literature, storytelling and the arts.







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18 May 2017

Library educational resources on Indigenous cultures and histories


The Library's resources can assist student teachers and others to gain a better understanding of Indigenous culture, says librarian Zachary Kendal.


School visit to the Aboriginal tent embassy Canberra*.
Australia’s Indigenous history goes back tens of thousands of years. In our schools, how do we best engage with the current and historical richness of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and stories? Imagine you’re a school teacher, weaving Indigenous cultures and histories into your teaching—what resources could you draw on?

Fortunately for our teachers-in-training and educational researchers, Monash University Library's wide range of resources can be used to engage with our Indigenous cultures.

Consider these streaming video resources:
  • Informit EduTV: Indigenous Studies – This collection within EduTV contains a huge range of documentaries and TV series on Australian Indigenous studies, including the ABC Kids shorts Grandpa Honeyant Storytime, the ABC series Black Comedy, and the new NITV current affairs series The Point.
  • Kanopy: Indigenous Studies – This collection brings together videos about indigenous populations around the world. It’s also worth looking at Kanopy’s AIATSIS Ethnographic Collection, which focuses on Australian Indigenous cultures and histories.
  • Monash Country Lines Archive – A collaboration between Monash University researchers, animators, and postgraduate students, this project creates stunning 3D animations to assist in the sharing and preservation of Indigenous knowledge and stories. Take a look at this “Winjara Wiganhanyin (Why We All Die)” animation, which retells a Taungurung creation story.
If you’re wanting to do more in-depth research into Indigenous cultures and histories, you could explore some of the scholarly databases available through the Library, including
You can also take a look at our Indigenous Cultures and Histories Library Guide which includes links to these and other useful resources.



Monash University Library is developing services and programs that focus on improving access, participation, retention and success for students from low socio-economic status (SES) backgrounds. The social inclusion-related programs are being implemented across campuses. Contact Zachary Kendal or Roland Clements to find out more.


*Photo Craig Hodges 2010  CC BY 2.0

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7 October 2015

Math Tutor

Get a handle on those concepts in maths that you missed out on at school, or can't remember, writes Tracey Whyte, Subject Librarian for Education at Berwick.


If you want to build your mathematical skills and confidence then go to Math Tutor online.

The Library provides access to this excellent resource via the Kanopy streaming database and you can access it via the Library's Search tool.

"The Math Tutor Collection offers a selection offers video tutorials on topics from secondary mathematics, aimed at students who wish to revise these topics in preparation for study at University, but equally useful for those meeting this content for the first time.

"I recommended some of the videos in the 'Sequences and Series' topic to my students, because I thought the content was clearly and thoroughly explained, and might support those students who were meeting this content for the first time."

(Monica Baker, lecturer, PhD student and maths teacher)

The content covers over 80 mathematics topics and provides diagrams and worked examples to clearly explain mathematical concepts. There are a series of eight videos to watch:
  • Geometry and Vectors
  • Algebra
  • Integration
  • Arithmetic
  • Trigonometry
  • Functions and graphs
  • Sequences and series
  • Differentiation
Each topic describes the subjects taught within each video and displays between five and 11 clips ranging from 10 minutes to over an hour.

For those who want to challenge their skills a bit more, Math Tutor has created a website that contains these videos with diagnostic tests, exercises and a pdf text version. These resources are available from the Math Tutor website.


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17 April 2015

Using the Library’s extensive Teaching Materials Collection

Ever wondered what to use and how to get the most out of your teaching placements?  Needing to structure your lessons in a particular way? The Library has a collection of teaching resources just for this purpose...by Carlie Nekrasov


Large abacus from the Teaching Materials Collection
The Teaching Materials Collection is varied and can be used in any teaching setting, including early childhood, primary and secondary teaching rounds. It includes board books, musical instruments, DVDs, big books (over 40cm in height or width), junior and young adult fiction books and educational kits and toys.

How to locate teaching materials in Search

Teaching materials are called ‘curriculum materials’ in the Library’s online Search interface. For instance, to find ‘educational toys’ you simply type the words into the search box. You then need to apply the facets on the left hand side to narrow down your search to ‘curriculum materials’ (found under the ‘Special collection’ heading).

To physically locate your item, click on ‘Get it’ as this will show which library holds the item. You can even request an item if it is only held at another campus.

Which campuses have a Teaching Materials Collection?

The Teaching Materials Collection is found at three of our libraries - Berwick, Matheson and Peninsula. Peninsula’s collection is located on level 2 of the Library. Matheson currently has their collection located on the first floor. Berwick’s collection can be found off to the right of the information desk just before the general collection begins.

Do you have to be an Education student to access the materials?

Certainly not. The collection can be accessed by staff and students for personal use also. For example the collection contains a huge range of award-winning Australian picture books for children that can be borrowed for reading at home.


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6 March 2015

Online streaming of 10,000+ television programs



Studying Education and wondering how to give more pep to your lesson plans and engage your students when you are on placement? Or are you a lecturer who wants to ensure your students have  access to particular program content? .... by Ellen O'Hehir



EduTV is for you! It is a TV online streaming resource that makes it easy for both students and lecturers to find and instantly watch television content and embed clips from TV shows into their presentations, projects and lessons.

There are an amazing number of programs (over 10,000!) to choose from including documentaries, dramas, series and shows from both broadcast and pay TV. Each week there are 80 new programs added and the archive spans back to 2006. That’s nine years of television!

EduTV provides content across a huge variety of learning areas such as History, Politics, Languages, Indigenous Studies, Performing Arts, Science, Health, Business, Technology and many more.

The database comes with heaps of features:
  • Recent TV programs can be watched on your computer, tablet or even smartphone;
  • program study guides, found under the ‘Resources’ tab, are created by Australian Teachers of Media. The study guides, which are downloadable, are written by experts in film, documentary and media studies and are an excellent resource for Education students;
  • there are advanced searching options and the ‘Quick search’ box allows you to search for programs by simply typing in keywords;
  • you can create clips from shows to show in your classes or lectures;
  • closed captions are available;
  • you can share videos with other EduTV users via email, Facebook and Twitter.  
Best of all - there are no ads!

If you are a Monash staff or student, you have free access to EduTV as one of the Library’s many database subscriptions.  Get in touch with your subject librarian if you have questions about this or other streaming video databases available through the Library.


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